Volunteer Spotlight: Knight Stivender

Knight Stivender

Knight Stivender
CEO, Girls To The Moon
Director of Client Success, Alcott Marketing Science
Volunteer, NAMA Marketing Technology SIG Committee

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I joined NAMA six years ago when I was transitioning from a career in Journalism to a career in Marketing and Advertising. I found it to be a nice blend of learning and networking.

You currently serve (or have served) on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I’ve served in a variety of board roles, including Communications Chair, Programming Chair, and Marketing Technology SIG Chair. I initially volunteered for the same reason I think a lot of people do – because a friend roped me into it! But I stuck around because NAMA has been tremendously valuable in my own career, and I feel I owe it to the organization to give back as much as I can.

What has been (or was) your proudest moment in this role?
When I was Programming Chair, my team and I brought in one of NAMA’s most diverse and inclusive lineups of luncheon speakers. I’m proud of that, though I think we can always do better and should be constantly thinking of ways we can be more reflective of our growing and changing community.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I’ve met people who have become clients, sponsors, mentors, employees, and friends. I could literally put a dollar value on parts of it, but that would be giving away trade secrets. 🙂 And besides that, the most important parts transcend monetization.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
The diversity of industries and professional experiences of the members, speakers and event attendees sets NAMA apart from other professional organizations of which I’ve been a part. I hear a lot of people say this, and I’ve found it to be the case myself.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
My team and I were finalists for a Pulitzer Prize for our breaking news coverage of the Nashville floods in 2010. We knew almost immediately that Saturday the rains started that we were in for a historic weather event, and my own neighborhood was one where people were evacuated in boats. It was incredible.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
You’ll learn a lot – from both a professional standpoint as well as a “who’s who” of the Nashville marketing, advertising and agency scene.

Nashville’s Super Bowl Moment

By Samuel Cowden, Guest Blogger | 2.26.17

The Super Bowl is still quite visible in our rearview mirror, and we have been exposed to the year’s most exquisite examples of advertising.

The big game was an opportunity for brands to impress, to excite, and to entice. With advertising spots, even the shortest, running bills of over a million dollars, brands carefully considered their advertising — making sure to make the most of an opportunity, and audience, that only comes once a year.

Here’s the thing, Nashville is having it’s Super Bowl moment. The nation is watching us, waiting to see what we have to offer.

Unfortunately — in the business world — we don’t have much to show them because our approach to advertising is about as refined as a used car salesman’s.

In 2012, my business partner and I moved to Nashville from a small town 20 minutes outside of Dayton, Ohio to start a commercial animation studio. Nashville seemed like the perfect place to begin — fertile ground, as they say — due to its burgeoning economic landscape.

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Only a few years after the economic crisis of 2008, Nashville was growing faster than almost any city in the country and we were looking to capitalize — and we did. Nearly five years later, we’re still here — and doing pretty well.

There’s just one catch, less than ten percent of our business will originate in Nashville this year.

In the beginning, we played the game. We paid ourselves next to nothing, taking every job that came our way — no matter the budget — just to get our foothold. Our studio began to grow. We hired new employees and started making livable salaries. We were given the opportunity to work with some of the biggest advertising agencies in the world as well as directly with businesses like Bad Robot, Amazon, and CBS.

However, Nashville advertisers quickly began to balk at our budgets. When working in Nashville we were constantly face-to-face with a question — make great work or make a living? We were at war with a culture of low expectations.

Of all the obstacles to overcome, low expectations may be the hardest. Once somebody tells you that what you’re doing is good enough, it becomes indescribably harder to be convinced otherwise.

Well, here’s your wake-up call. Here’s somebody telling you that the rest of the country is passing you by while you’re busy pinching pennies.

On the other hand, maybe Nashville isn’t ready for its Super Bowl moment. Maybe we should tell the world to avert their eyes for a few years while we figure out this whole advertising thing. Maybe we just need a little time.

As I write this, I’m sitting in seat 15F on a plane bound for Los Angeles, followed by stops in Seattle and San Francisco — places that, when given their moment, didn’t fumble the ball.

 

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Samuel Cowden is the founder and Executive Producer of IV, an award-winning animation studio focused on creating beautiful videos about the human narrative for design-conscious brands including IDEO, Edelman, CBS, Amazon, and Google.

Volunteer Spotlight: Austin Harrison

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Austin Harrison
Relationship Director, Identity Visuals
NAMA Board Member, Sponsorship Chair

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I started coming to NAMA events shortly after moving to Nashville. My boss recommended it as a great place to learn about the Nashville marketing community.

You currently serve (or have served) on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
About four years ago – when I first started at my role for Identity Visuals – I literally had no idea what I was doing and knew no one. So many people helped me that first year, taking me to coffee, giving me advice, connecting me with people, and inviting me to events like NAMA. Joining the board and endeavoring to do the same things for other new Nashvillians is one of the ways I’ve tried to pay it forward.

What has been (or was) your proudest moment in this role?
Helping to start the NAMA Podcast and negotiating that sponsorship was definitely one of the highlights. Clark and Chuck at Relationary have been amazing to work with, and it was a blast helping to kick that off.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I’ve learned from the brightest Nashville (and sometimes other cities) has to offer, I’ve made lifetime friends, I’ve been able to help new people to town, and I’ve made great relationships that have resulted in working together. NAMA also was a huge part of making my first conference, the Mental Health Marketing Conference, successful last May.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
The quality of events, the welcoming nature, and the people.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
Seeing our small studio grow over the last four years to work with clients like CBS, Reddit, and Amazon. That and the time I got to tour the NASA Goddard Space station with the NASA animation team and see the James Webb Space Telescope in person – that was pretty cool.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
You will not find a better opportunity in the marketing community to learn, build relationships, and give back than NAMA.

Volunteer Spotlight: Tim Earnhart

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Tim Earnhart
Founder/CEO of Werkshop Branding
NAMA Board Member, Chair of Entertainment & Sports Marketing SIG

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I re-joined NAMA in 2014 as a board member. However, our company had been a member since 2008. NAMA is a great place to find industry thought leadership, networking opportunities, potential business, and amazing friendships.

You currently serve on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I enjoy giving of my time to valuable organizations that I personally will benefit from. NAMA provides multiple volunteer opportunities in various areas. It was easy for me to find a spot where I thought I could be of benefit to the organization. 

What has been (or was) your proudest moment in this role?
Upon joining the board in 2014, I initially served on the volunteer committee as co-chair and then chair. During this time I talked and met with countless professionals who wanted to get involved with NAMA and volunteer just like me. It was very fulfilling for me to meet these people and learn more about their passions and what drove them to want to get involved with NAMA.

Within the last few months, NAMA has launched the Entertainment & Sports Marketing SIG – their newest special interest group – and I have agreed to chair that SIG. It only makes sense for NAMA to have such a group given the impact both entertainment and sports have on Nashville.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
The past three years have been extremely positive for me. I have learned so much interacting with fellow board members, members, and speakers/panelists. You get out of anything what you put in it. I live in Kentucky, so I’ve made it a commitment and priority to attend as many of the NAMA events as possible.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
NAMA is diverse. It’s that simple. Meaning, those who are involved with NAMA come from various professional disciplines like marketing, branding, advertising, communications, PR, social & digital media, C-suite, management, and even business ownership.

You will find a great mix of agency and corporate. I love this about NAMA. The diversity of our membership is great. This is what I think sets us apart from other groups.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
I’m what they call a serial entrepreneur, so I have had many memorable experiences. I’ve been a co-founder or partner of seven start-ups/companies over the last 16 years. I enjoy the excitement and challenges behind launching a new brand or growing an existing business.

I was honored in 2004 as the Small Business Person of the Year by the Bowling Green, KY Chamber of Commerce. My most proud moment was in 2012 when I was honored by Junior Achievement USA with the national Impact Award for my service to that non-profit organization. I’ve served on a local JA board for 20 years. 

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
Our time as professionals is precious. However, if you make a commitment to NAMA and all that it has to offer, it will be time well spent. You get out of it what you put in it. There’s plenty of other organizations and events in Nashville that can consume your time. However, if you are at all in the global world of marketing, you need to be a part of NAMA.

Volunteer Spotlight: Karen Stone

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Karen Stone
Director of Marketing, Amplion
Programming volunteer (2003-2004)
Programming Chair (2004-2005)
President Elect (2005-2006)
President (2006-2007)
Past President – CEA Award (2007-2008)
AMA Professional Chapters Council (2008-2014)
AMA Professional Chapters Council President (2011-2014)
AMA National Audit and Finance Committee (2014-2016)

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I joined NAMA to quickly increase my marketing knowledge. When I joined the organization in 2003, I was transitioning from my career in broadcast news and needed a way to rapidly ramp up my understanding of marketing principles and best practices. NAMA became my go to resource and still is today. The programming is consistently outstanding and my professional network is my lifeline.

You have served on NAMA’s Board in the past. Why did you decide to volunteer?
At my very first meeting, I made a programming suggestion to the current president. I don’t recall exactly what it was, but it must have been somewhat intriguing, because he asked to continue the conversation over coffee. Before I knew it, I was tapped to become programming chair and was hooked.

I learned that being a volunteer provided a valuable test environment for my budding marketing career. Every volunteer experience was a chance to learn something new and collaborate with incredible marketing minds from a variety of industries. Many of the people I met through those experiences became mentors who helped shape my career and are now some of my most cherished friends.

Having volunteered with NAMA and with the AMA at the national level for more than 13 years, I can tell you that I have received far more than I have given.

What has been the proudest moment as a volunteer?
My proudest moment by far was in 2008 when NAMA entered the national AMA Chapter of Excellence Awards for the first time ever and won first runner up.

It was my year as president of NAMA and the culmination of several years of work alongside a dynamic group of volunteers. Accepting that coveted award on behalf of the many hardworking volunteers who believed in the vision and mission and poured their heart and soul into the chapter to receive that validation and recognition was thrilling.

Since then, NAMA has grown to be such a respected force locally and nationally. I am very proud of the legacy of leadership in this organization and the committed volunteers that kick it up a notch year after year.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
NAMA is most definitely one of the best decisions of my professional career. I can honestly say I wouldn’t be where I am today without having joined this organization and invested my time as a volunteer.

The knowledge I gained and the friendships that formed laid a strong foundation for me to grow personally and professionally. From landing jobs and informing my marketing strategy to growing my leadership skills, there is no doubt NAMA has played a pivotal role in my career and continues to do so even today.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
The people and strong programming are two of the biggest differences in my mind. I visited several other organizations in town before deciding to join NAMA. There were none where I felt the warmth and immediate sense of belonging I felt here.

When I attend events or even just attend a mixer, I always take home some new piece of info I can use. I would say that’s a pretty strong ROI!

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
I’ve had so many wonderful experiences in my career, it’s difficult to choose just one, but if I have to narrow it down, I would say my current role has probably been the most fulfilling. Being a healthcare marketer, I get to go to work every day in a mission-driven technology company focused on improving the consistency and quality of patient care in hospitals.

The work we are doing at Amplion is transformational and disruptive. Developing the inbound marketing strategy and a thought leadership platform that is attracting attention from many of the top hospitals and hospital systems in the country gets me very excited.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
I’ve already mentioned this a number of times, but I would say as a marketer, there is no greater way to build your knowledge and network than being a part of NAMA.

Volunteering, in particular, can enrich your membership experience and your career in valuable ways that cannot be replicated any other way. Of course, like anything, it’s only as good as the quality of your investment. I’ve found the more you give, the more you gain. After 13 years of AMA membership and volunteer experience, I think I’m a pretty good case study for the benefits of volunteer service.

Volunteer Spotlight: Emily Fay

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Emily Fay
Marketing Manager, Remar, Inc.
Secretary (2015)
Board Member at Large (2012-2013)
Collegiate Relation Chair (2010-2012)

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I moved to Nashville in 2007 on a whim, I had no job, just my best friend from 3rd grade. As a member of the University of Nebraska – Lincoln AMA chapter I knew, if I wanted to meet the top marketers in town I needed to attend NAMA’s events.

You served on NAMA’s Board for several years. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I wasn’t really looking for more activities to get involved in when I was asked to help with the Collegiate Relations committee. However, I am a strong believer in the more you put into an organization the more you get out of it.

I also felt that having been a member of a collegiate chapter in the past, gave me some insight into what students would need and want from our chapter.

What was your proudest moment in your role as Collegiate Relations Chair?
That is easy! Dreaming up and executing the Marketing the Marketer event.

This event gave students the opportunity to connect with Marketers and HR professionals. They got to ask questions about everything from what it is like to work in Marketing to what to expect in an interview.

The first year we did this, I was expecting that maybe 15-20 students would be there, but we sold out of tickets and 40 students showed up!

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I don’t know where my career would be without NAMA. I have found both of my marketing positions in Nashville through this organization. The first role was an Account Manager at Allegiant Direct, Inc., and that job found me through the NAMA job board. The second role, my current position at Remar, was found through a NAMA Mixer.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
NAMA has a good mix of marketing folks, that are excited to learn from each other.

This is organization is fantastic for networking. The best part is that if your networking skill level doesn’t matter. If you are new to it, someone will guide you along. If networking is your expertise, there is always someone new and interesting to meet at NAMA.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
It is hard for me to pin point just one experience. There are highlights from every marketing role I have had. The one that is sticking out to me right now hasn’t happened yet. But, in a couple weeks the non-profit organization I started, Nashville Huskers, will host its 100th football watch party.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
I said this before, but the more you put into NAMA the more you get out of it, and in order to volunteer with NAMA, you need to be a member.

When you volunteer with NAMA you make connections with incredible marketers, and they can actually see the quality of your work. For me, when it came to finding a job, the recommendation from someone who I had volunteered with was a factor in getting the job I have today.

NAMA Member Brings Husker Fans Together for a Kick-off with a Cause

By Katie Soltas, NAMA Blogger | 10.30.16

Remar, Inc.’s marketing manager and longtime NAMA member, Emily Fay, simply wanted to bond with a few Nebraska Cornhusker fans during football season without leaving her new home of Nashville.

What she started became more than a small group of game day buddies, but a movement that has generated thousands of dollars in college scholarships for Nashvillians and has pumped nearly $240,000 into Music City’s economy through food and beverage sales.

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Fay moved to Nashville in 2007 from Nebraska. In 2009, she performed digital research and recruiting on Facebook and LinkedIn, inviting Husker alumni to watch the football season opener at what was formerly Closing Bell on Demonbreun Hill. Twenty people confirmed their attendance, but 80 fans showed up to the first game – greatly exceeding Fay’s expectations.

Since then, the “Nashville Huskers” migrated to several locations in the city until they landed a permanent home, the Tin Roof 2 in Cool Springs, where they have met the past four seasons.

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More than 150 fans gather each weekend, and Fay has kept detailed records showing the group’s annual financial impact for the establishments where they congregate. Although it can be challenging for restaurants to meet the needs of the large group, the herd brings in up to $40,000 in revenue each football season.

But for Fay, watching the games wasn’t enough.

Through merchandise sales and other means, she led the group in raising $18,000 over the past five years for the University of Nebraska Legends scholarship that goes to three deserving Middle Tennessee college applicants every year.

College football brings the Nashville Huskers together, but the professional networking and relationship-building opportunities is what keeps the group alive and thriving.

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During our interview, Fay rattles off several long-lost relatives and friends that found each other through the group, including her mother and a childhood friend who rekindled their friendship. Two Husker alumni fell in love (let’s assume over beer and wings) during a season and are now married. One Nashville Husker’s friends from Purdue came every year when their team played Nebraska. Last year, he tragically passed away from cancer and his friends still came to Nashville during the Purdue game to honor him.

“Everyone in the group knows each other now, and we are all connected somehow,” said Fay, who is looking forward to their 100th watch party on Nov. 19. “I never imagined it would turn into a true community.”

Incoming NAMA President: Get Ready to Have Some Fun!

By Jamie Dunham, NAMA President | 7.24.16

Happy New Year, NAMA!

It seems a little funny to say, “Happy New Year,” but for the Nashville Chapter of the American Marketing Association (NAMA), it’s a New Year, and our talented new board has been busy with plans for new NAMA year 2016-2017.

www.public-domain-image.com (public domain image)

So in the spirit of the season, let’s throw some confetti and thank last year’s leaders for a great foundation on which to grow. And let’s countdown this New Year with some new goals and initiatives – because that’s what marketers do.

Here are some of the changes in our new year:

New Venue for Our Power Lunches
That’s right, we are moving our lunch meetings to the fantastic City Winery venue that will well accommodate our speakers and programming with state-of-the-art staging and audio-visual.

And we will have discounts for Lyft to get us there in style.

Our Hospitality Chair Teresa Faust is working with her group to get us ready for our first Thursday Power Lunch on Sept. 8. And our programming committee led by Ann Howard is planning smart insightful speakers.

New sponsor Relationary Marketing will create podcasts with our speakers to allow us to know them better.

The First NAMA JAMA
What’s your jam? Ours is The One Hitters, a fun One Hit Wonders Band, where NAMA member Peter Cronin and his band mates rock out.

2016 NAMA JAMA Graphic

So “Baby Come Back” to our NAMA JAMA Mixer on Aug. 9 at Stagepost. You like it “More Today than Yesterday,” and you’ll be “Fallin’ in Love” with NAMA and your new friends.

Mixing Up Our Mixers
After NAMA JAMA, we’ll be hitting the road for our mixers, exploring offices of some of the top marketing groups in town and visiting some interesting businesses in town.

A big thanks goes to Lynn Bennett’s membership team and the Grand Mixer Bill Selph for getting us out on the town.

Also, look for impromptu invitations to pop-up events for drinks in a popular watering hole.

Serious about SIGs
President-Elect Lori Whitbey and the SIG chairs are working on new SIG events for B2B, Healthcare, Non-Profits, Marketing Technology, Research and Collegiate Relations.

Get to know our SIG Chairs – B2B’s Paula Milam, Healthcare’s Andrea Gillotte, Non-Profits’ Bob Duthie, Marketing Technology’s Knight Stivender, Research’s Sheila King and Collegiate Relations James Scherer and mark your calendar for your favorite group.

We will also be extending the invitation to members interested in SIG start-up events in new categories like entertainment.

Free Member Events
Sometimes we just like to roll up of sleeves and learn some new things.  Sponsorship’s chair Austin Harrison is working with our sponsors on some casual member-free events to allow us to learn some new skills. Stay tuned.

Our Sponsors are leading the way in making our year successful. We thank each of them for their contributions.

And our treasurers Jason Hoard and Jeff Peden are keeping us fiscally responsible. Oh, and they love a good party.

Our historian Julie McReynolds is providing continuity, and our secretary Kurt Kirton is working on updates to our Job Board.

Our Communications team, led by Melinda Hudgins Noblitt and our Social Media team chaired by Elizabeth Duffey, will make sure you are informed with new blogs, a newsletter, website updates, and social media. Mark your calendars!

And our Volunteer team chaired by Tim Earnhardt will make sure you find a place to plug in.

Our goals are pretty simple: this year is about making long-lasting marketing friends, learning some audacious new skills, and having a little fun.

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Please take the time to make new friends at NAMA. Instead of just coming to “network,” wouldn’t it be great if you got involved, made lasting relationships, learned some new skills, and found great business partners?!

That’s something to toast about! Happy New Year, NAMA!

 


jamiedunham

Jamie Dunham is 2016-2017 President of Nashville AMA. She is founder and president of Brand Wise, a brand strategy firm with a focus on building culturally relevant brands. She authors the popular blog Lipstick Economy offering perspectives on marketing to women. Brand Wise is hosting Red Letter Day, a one-day marketing to women event on August 5. 

Member Spotlight: Katie Soltas

Katie Soltas

Katie Soltas
Account Supervisor, DVL Seigenthaler
Co-Chair, NAMA Communications Committee

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I’ve been involved with AMA since 2012, when I served as the programming co-chair in Hawaii. It was a natural move to join NAMA because I knew there would be networking opportunities when I moved to Nashville.

The group exceeded my expectations; I received a warm welcome from like-minded individuals who provided my first real sense of southern hospitality. It was comforting to have a foundation of friendship upon entering a new community. 

You currently serve on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
NAMA has done a lot for me, and I feel a responsibility to give back. As a PR professional, communicating an organization’s message in a strategic way is my passion.

What has been your proudest moment in this role?
I helped to launch the inaugural e-newsletter in February, which was an excellent professional development experience.

Now I love working with our Emma platform and can teach others how to use it! We always appreciate feedback and new ideas for the monthly newsletter.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
NAMA directly led me to my current position at DVL Seigenthaler, which was exactly what I was searching for in Nashville.

Current member Bill Selph, who I had only met by email at the time, introduced me to a contact that believed in me and provided amazing referrals. I feel lucky and am grateful for their help.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
I like the fact that NAMA is established and better-organized than many professional organizations. I LOVE that it’s comprised of marketing pros from many different disciplines that challenge me to think in ways outside of my comfort zone.

And it’s not as formal or scary as some referral groups (insert nervous teeth emoji).

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
I’ve been fortunate to work with many prestigious organizations and leaders, but meeting some of the last World War II Pearl Harbor survivors (and sharing their story with the media) on the teak decks of Battleship Missouri will remain at the top of my list.

Two other very important memories close to my heart were supporting the Waikiki Aquarium’s conservation efforts toward a more sustainable ocean ecosystem and helping Sheraton Kona share its important Hawaiian cultural story and history with its guests.

I can’t wait to see what Music City has in store for my career!

 

5 Enticingly Healthy Brand Bites

By Melinda Scruggs Gales, Guest Blogger | 7.18.16

There’s lots to love about Nashville. Most of all, we like the many ways to expand your mind, not just your waistline (check out Nashville’s culinary kudos here).

You can’t be everywhere, so we’re serving up nourishment from five healthcare industry events you may have missed. On our menu: Meat & Three, plus Sweet Ice Tea.

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Fried Chicken
Health:Further Quarterly (5/10)

Focus on Interoperability with Jumpstart Foundry, Vanderbilt University, Health System Partnerships, Octovis, Virsys12, and more. To transform healthcare, focus on each patient (customer) as an individual.

We need faster and more affordable ways to connect and use the vast field of existing data in medical equipment, Electronic Health Records (EHR), DNA, insurance claims and more. Accessibility meeting clear standards in a single source of protected digital truth – this is true interoperability.

Quote of the day: “Government sets the floor (through policy), not the bar (our processes) – aim higher.” – Anita Summarth/@ClinovationsGov

Take-a-way: If you’re only striving to achieve compliance, you’ll miss the opportunity to lead.

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Green Beans
American Marketing Association (Nashville – #NAMA) Healthcare Special Interest Group (5/10)

Searching for the Elusive ROI with Lewis Communications, Alliance Oncology, LifePoint Health and The Tennessean. With healthcare payments shifting from volume to value, it’s critical to clearly identify what needs to be measured before you start tracking data or you’ll end up with numbers, not data, for decisions.

Quote of the day: “Patients (customers) arrive at your door daily for a number of reasons, be sure you ask them why (gather qualitative or ‘unstructured’ data) and combine that with standardized check boxes (quantitative or ‘structured’).” –Susan Polier, Alliance Oncology

Take-a-way: Don’t ever replace real customer conversation with surveys. The combination will provide a better picture and move you faster to strong ROI.

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Mac & Cheese
Werkshop DIG Seminar (5/24)

How Data Science is Revolutionizing the Art of Marketing with Jim Alcott, Alcott Marketing Science. Most brands have a “persona” in mind when they’re selling, but rarely look at hard data to analyze actual shoppers and their “propensity to purchase.”

When the Shark Tank investor asks for your customer acquisition cost, will you have a researched number or a guess?

Quote of the day: “Easier customer acquisition is not always indicative of true customer value.” – Jim Alcott, Alcott Marketing Science

Take-a-way: Great marketing is a delicious mix of art and science – don’t skimp on either.

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Okra (fried of course)
Mental Health Marketing Conference (May 12-13)

Directing Individuals to Treatment Through Modern Marketing with Lipscomb University, Foundations Recovery Networks, Insight Counseling Centers, Centerstone, and more. This impressive debut event featured quality speakers highlighting the mental healthcare market, now being openly courted as a result of the Affordable Care Act.

All industries can learn how disruption opens doors for opportunity by watching this revolution.

Quote of the 2 days: “We must stop viewing mental health as separate from medical health” – Paul Gionfriddo (via Kriste Goad, Revive).

Take-a-way: Stop looking at a slice of your customer persona in relation to your offer – see them as whole people with many needs in order to build relationships, not a sales number.

icetea

Sweet Ice Tea
Salon @615 Event (5/18)

Steve Case, author, The Third Wave, with Stuart McWhorter and John Ingram presented by the Nashville Public Library Foundation. Sometimes you have to check the view from 50,000 feet (at least) and look at history in order to be visionary about the future.

Understanding how technology caused culture change in waves is critical: Wave 1 – disruption of communication — Wave 2 – disruption of commerce — Wave 3 – disruption of business and everyday life.

Quote of the day: “This new generation will drive change motivated by both profit and purpose.” – Steve Case.

Take-a-way: To be truly successful, stay curious about what is possible and what will benefit others.
Thanks for taking the time to share a digital meal with us. If you’re a successful brand wanting to be heard above the noise, come talk to us. Reach out at elevate@galesnetwork.com

This post originally appeared on Gales Network Blog.

melindascruggs
Melinda Scruggs Gales is Chief Brand Strategist for Nashville-based brand consultancy GALES NETWORK, a proven catalyst for brand clarity, strategy and effective action for clients in healthcare, entertainment, and technology.