[PODCAST] Staying focused on healthy marketing with Evan Tardy

As president of the wellness website DrAxe.com, Evan Tardy not only knows how to build a healthy mind and body, but also a healthy marketing strategy for businesses.

It’s that secret of strategy he’ll be sharing as 2018’s first AMA Nashville Power Lunch speaker on Thursday, January 11 at City Winery, diving into the history of DrAxe and how the company has been able to connect with people around the world.

“Our company exists to transform lives. That’s been the vision from day one,” Tardy said.

“Day one” happened around eight years ago, Tardy said, when he first met successful clinician Dr. Josh Axe with a site and newsletter dedicated to getting holistic, empowering nutrition information to patients.

“‘If I have to stack chairs to be a part of what you’re doing, then I’ll do that. I’m in,’” he remembered saying to Axe on the phone after learning more about the founder’s mission.

A month later, Tardy had moved to Nashville and jumped headfirst into DrAxe.com, making pivotal decisions at Axe’s kitchen table and shipping the site’s products from the garage.

And as the business started small, so did the marketing. Starting with Axe’s first 200 newsletter subscribers and 300 to 400 likes on Facebook, the team tracked followers by the 1s and 5s, Tarday said, aspiring to one day have a page with thousands of followers like that of entrepreneur Tim Ferriss.

“I remember looking at all of that and looking at people that were ahead of us and thinking ‘Wow, how could we get to that level?’ But through trying and trying and continuing to push through, we started throwing stuff against the wall and starting to see what stuck,” he said.

Today, 2.5 million people follow the Dr. Axe Facebook page. 2 million people receive the newsletter. And the business’s website registers 14.5 million unique visitors per month. According to Alexa’s metrics tracking service, this makes them the No. 1 natural health website in the world, Tardy said.

Two major factors played into the road from 200 to 2 million, Tardy said. The first part of Dr. Axe’s strategy was one of Tardy’s favorite lessons from Gary Vaynerchuk’s book “Crush It!”

“Give value, give value, give value. Then ask for business,” Tardy said

By creating valuable content for consumers before asking for their business, Dr. Axe built a foundation on providing educational content – 2 to 3 articles per day – and established an audience for the product before it even existed.

It also means actively trading providing “information” – which, in this day and age, is readily available for anyone who wants it, Tardy pointed out – for “insight,” creating relevant content on how to apply knowledge for lasting change.

The second factor in the marketing plan was the company’s choice to not strike out in many directions at once with their marketing campaign, but rather to make every move very intentional.

“For us, we decided to really focus our efforts on being really, really good at one channel, mastering it. Once we got past the 80/20 of results on that channel, then we started working on another channel,” he said.

For Dr. Axe, that first, main social channel was Facebook. By zeroing in on one platform and “proactively ignoring” others four years ago, the team was able to consistently create content built specifically for a certain community, investing energy, time and care in one place and seeing major change as a result.

The team’s efforts on social media, content development, SEO, article marketing and email marketing all tie in together to create a cohesive marketing strategy that has rocketed Dr. Axe from $2M to over $100M in less than 4 years.

But perhaps the real secret of success lies in the advice of one of Tardy’s friends.

“He says that the key to being successful is to have one really good idea and then be extremely careful to never have another good idea. It’s making sure you don’t get distracted,” he joked.

Tardy will be the keynote speaker at AMA Nashville Power Lunch’s The 4 Pillars of Digital Marketing on January 11. Register now.

Moving Forward with AMA Nashville is brought to you by Relationary Marketing, specializing in turn-key B2B Podcast Production, and Astute Communications, a web design and digital marketing agency.

[PODCAST] Company culture as marketing with Buffer’s Courtney Seiter

By Chuck Bryant | 5.3.17

Sometimes, the way a company upholds its values can be just as valuable a marketing point as its product, and perhaps nobody knows that better than Buffer Director of People Courtney Seiter, who will be presenting “Company Culture as Marketing” at NAMA Power Lunch on May 4.  

Buffer is a platform for scheduling, sharing and analyzing social media for small businesses, pursuing a two-pronged mission: In addition to giving people a greater voice on social media, Buffer also aims to create the future of work.

“It’s a little bit of a lofty mission there, and it’s kind of up to interpretation sometimes, but we often will talk about what the future of work looks like and how we can get there and how we can help other people talk about that and have those conversations to get there too,” Seiter said.

In order to accomplish this goal, Buffer takes radical approaches to traditional workplace practices.

First, its more than 75 team members are fully remote, with employees living across the world, fostering a global community of both flexibility and creative problem solving.

“We have to create unique ways to work together. If I want to talk to Adnan in Sri Lanka and I want to talk to Hannah in the UK, we’ve got some timezone things, we’ve got some asynchronous communications to overcome,” Seiter said.

Second, Buffer seeks to pioneer a culture of transparency, maintaining measures that not only keep everyone up to date on happenings in the workspace, but giving customers information access as well.

“We have a set of ten values that guide everything we do. One of those is ‘Default to transparency.’ That means, to me, unless there’s a clear tangible reason why you wouldn’t share something within the team and possibly to the wider public, go ahead and share it,” Seiter said. “For us that has created a really wonderful situation where there are no secrets on the team as far as how we work, as far as how we get paid, as far as why we price our product the way we do. And there are no secrets between us and our community and us and our customers.”

In one of its biggest moves of transparency, Buffer began making salaries public in 2013, publishing income numbers for every team member. This move, Seiter said, was a reaction to the lack of guidance available for deciding salaries in tech.

“The idea is when we began to build Buffer in the very early days, there’s a lot of high-level advice on how to pay people, how to structure benefits, but there wasn’t a whole lot for our founders to look at — it was really in the weeds– about how to structure pay and how do you pay people and make sure it’s equitable,” she said.

The move was anxiety-inducing for some team members who were concerned about how people would react once the information was available. However, in the years since Buffer published the numbers, it has proved itself a blueprint for more fair pay and applications to the company have increased by 40 percent.

In addition to transparent salaries, Buffer also allows for email conversations between two or more people to be viewed by any other members of the company, allowing for email trails to be traced back and referenced by anyone who needs them.

Employees also take turns helping out with customer support, allowing them to take part in other means of external transparency as well, showing customers how their money is being spent, and, in Seiter’s experience, seeing how much people appreciate the level of transparency the company upholds.

“The idea is that you as a Buffer customer should know where your money is going to. We respect our customers enough to recognize that’s information they want to know and that it will benefit them and make our relationship stronger to have that knowledge,” she said.

While it takes significant time and effort for a company to implement radical workplace changes like widespread transparency, Seiter said that companies can start by looking into the heart of the company and what drives its mission. Without these goals, it can difficult for companies to put into place future-thinking ways of changing the workplace.

“One thing that people, founders and organizations can do is to look to their values. If they do have values, they tend to be written on a wall or in the breakroom or somewhere not referred to all that often,” Seiter said.

Once those values are identified or created, founders should look for creative new ways to hold people accountable for making progress in company culture, backing them up with policy and experimenting with new methods.

This isn’t something that can be done without a passion behind it, however, Seiter said.

“It has to be genuine and authentic. I don’t think you can start out in this mission thinking ‘Oh, if we share this, the New York Times is going to want our story.’ It has to come form an organic and helpful and authentic and genuine place. People will recognize that and will respond to that. People can also recognize that false note really, really quickly,” she said.

But, if done with a genuine and creative spirit, radical changes in company culture can be a piece of the marketing platform in and of themselves, attracting customers and personalities that are interested and excited to contribute.

“People want to see companies doing good. People want to align themselves with mission, with values they believe in. You have so many choices today; you can choose from any number of products to solve any sort of issue for you, but with that choice there needs to be something else you hang onto. I think values are quickly becoming the thing that I personally choose when I choose a product or a service. And a lot of folks feel that way: They want something more,” Seiter said.

For more information about Buffer, visit them online at buffer.com and check out their transparency blog at open.bufferapp.com.

Seiter will be the keynote speaker at NAMA Power Lunch’s Company Culture as Marketing featuring Buffer on May 4. Register now.

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

 

[PODCAST] Busting the myths of brand storytelling with Lindsay Jamieson

By Chuck Bryant | 2.26.17

In today’s advertising environment, selling a product based on emotion is just as important – if not more – than selling based on reason.

“It’s very much about emotional positioning or creating emotion in the narrative. Some people are good at that. Some people don’t dare do it,” said Lindsay Jamieson, founder of brand-strategy company Jamieson Brand.

To Jamieson, however, it seems as though advertisers have taken that narrative strategy a little too far – an idea that he will bring to the table on as the speaker at NAMA Power Lunch on Thursday, March 2, at City Winery.

“I think for the last 10 years, people have been sort of rambling along about, ‘That’s how you do marketing—you tell a story.’  And a lot of marketing companies and advertising agencies make big claims about being storytellers, and ‘We’ll tell your brand’s story,’ and that sort of stuff,” Jamieson said. “But some people are looking at that the wrong way ‘round.”

At the intersection of marketing, branding, and business, different means often come to the forefront of industry attention as the new best solution, Jamieson said.

And while using brand storytelling as a method of advertising is effective in building a two-way relationship with customers, advertisers often forget that what the product has to offer is just as important.

“There’s the product story – which is the buy, which is all of these features, and what color it is, and how much it is, and everything literally tangible around the product offering,” Jamieson continued. Then there’s the brand story, and that’s where you begin to explore higher level concepts, abstract values, beliefs, intangible elements that build personality into the bigger offering

One brand that does this particularly well, Jamieson said, is Louis Vuitton, which manages to seduce potential customers with a big picture that’s full of emotion.

“They take you into another world that you can relate to and desire to be in,” he said.

Jamieson explained how successful ad campaigns can help sell not only the product, but the brand itself; a brand cannot really be owned, but only influenced in how it is perceived. This means that it’s often difficult for people on the inside to gauge a brand’s effectiveness.

“The reason I have a job is because marketing yourself is really, really hard,” Jamieson said.

In order to combat this, advertisers must stay open-minded, listening to the perspectives of those who know the industry, and gathering an arsenal of knowledge by observing how other brands solve or don’t solve problems.

That also includes getting distance from the industry sometimes. Jamieson said he frequently DVRs television to skip the ads, closes his computer for the weekend, and takes walks in nature every single day to avoid overstimulation.

“The last 10 years have been exponential in the growth of noise,” he said.

All of it chalks up to members deliberately disrupting themselves from an industry that is overflowing with new content, even if it’s no7t always good content, Jamieson added.

“I’m not looking for failure, I’m just seeing it. And then I’m getting excited when I see good creativity,” he said.

Jamieson will be the keynote speaker at NAMA Power Lunch’s Debunking the Myths about Brand Storytelling on March 2. Register now.

 

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

The changing attitudes of consumerism in healthcare with Mark Lee Taylor

By Chuck Bryant, Relationary Marketing | 1.4.17

Healthcare in Nashville is a billion-dollar industry, but not all of what drives consumers’ medical decisions is based on what happens on the operating table or in the physician’s office.

With more than 20 years under his belt, Mark Lee Taylor knows a thing or two about how to inform and advertise to those looking for care for themselves or their loved ones.

Taylor is the Director of Communications for the Clinical Services Group at HCA, where he develops new and innovating ways to connect with consumers in the healthcare sector. He will be moderating a panel on how to navigate the shift toward consumerism in healthcare marketing at NAMA’s Power Lunch on Thursday, Jan. 12, at City Winery.

According to Taylor, many people see healthcare as a consumerist service or product until they or a loved one need healthcare, at which point it becomes a vital need. This urgency sets healthcare apart from most other industries in which major decisions can be postponed or researched over time.

That’s where healthcare marketing comes in – providing information as immediately and seamlessly as possible, while also minimizing negative experiences and impact, Taylor explained.

“People have to look at a lot of information fast and have to find a lot of answers fast. The marketer that can provide the easiest pathway to give them information and solve their problem really has the upper hand,” Taylor said.

Having worked as a healthcare marketing pioneer in the ‘90s with St. Thomas Heart Institute, Taylor has noticed a significant shift in both the focus of the industry and its consumers in just a couple of decades.

“A lot of the advertising campaigns for hospitals were centered around caring and how much the hospitals provided care, what great care they provided. It focused on advertising and community outreach more than any other marketing technique. Things have certainly changed since then,” Taylor said.

Today, he said, there is an inherent expectation that there is caring in the service industry, so people are more interested in good outcomes and cost transparency. Taylor believes that easy access to healthcare information – both true and false – has contributed to this shift.

“There’s so much more information available than there was previously. Before that, you had to rely on a physician or someone else or word of mouth to find out what you wanted. Back when we were doing advertising for healthcare systems, we were just trying to get people to indicate that they wanted to make a choice about where they went,” Taylor said.

Today’s healthcare consumers not only have more of a choice in where they seek care, but they are also “savvier” consumers with a higher service expectation, Taylor continued. Whereas patients might previously have been willing to wait two hours at a physician’s office, consumers today place emphasis on access and convenience in each step of their healthcare process

“There’s a lot of internal resistance in healthcare to refer to patients as consumers, and I think that point has finally hit the tipping point where people understand ‘Oh, they’re patients and consumers. Consumers have choices and are not going to blindly go where they’re sent.’”

Looking toward the future of healthcare marketing, Taylor said that big focuses will be on implementation of service standards in the physician’s offices and quick, convenient means of response between health care services and consumers.

“There’s two ways of looking at anything, and life’s all about how you look at it. In this case, it’s a really exciting time to be in healthcare. We’re going to need creative, innovative ideas more than ever. And who is it that comes up with those things in America? It’s marketers,” he said.

Connect with Taylor on LinkedIn.

On Jan. 12, Taylor will moderate How Consumerism is Affecting Healthcare Marketing alongside SmileDirectClub’s Hal Hassall, Nicole Provonchee of MissionPoint Health, and Celina Burns, consultant to Healthcare Blue Book at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.


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Chuck Bryant is co-founder and CEO of Relationary Marketing, a podcast production agency that creates broadcast-quality interviews for rich content marketing, event promotion, relationship nurturing and thought leadership.

[PODCAST] Finding your personal value with Jennifer Way

By Chuck Bryant, Relationary Marketing | 10.27.16

Jennifer Way wants to help make marketers their own biggest advocates by revealing their personal value.

“Your resume should be the Cliff Notes of your values, not a job description,” Way said.

Way is a consultant and president of Way Solutions. Her company has worked with Disney, Amazon, and Honda to help get the most out of their employees. She’ll be helping guests unlock the power of their personal value at NAMA’s Power Lunch on Thursday, Nov. 3.

“Unleashing the power of your personal value is about learning how to identify the key factors that will get you the recognition and rewards you need,” Way said. “What employer doesn’t want more value from an employee?”

Way said that finding personal value is not about expanding any more effort, but instead is about understanding dynamics in your work system.

People in the workplace don’t learn how to be personal advocates on their own. Instead they learn slowly from other’s mistakes, when really they need to look at themselves objectively and put themselves in the opposite role, according to Way. This is where marketers have a unique advantage.  

“They understand exactly how to look at themselves objectively in a business-to-business situation, but feel awkward turning that marketing eye on themselves.”

Connect with Way on LinkedIn.

On Nov. 3, Jennifer Way presents Unlock the Power of Your Value at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

chuck-bryant
Chuck Bryant is co-founder and CEO of Relationary Marketing, a podcast production agency that creates broadcast-quality interviews for rich content marketing, event promotion, relationship nurturing and thought leadership.

[PODCAST] Dan Rogers brings stories to life at the Grand Ole Opry

By Chuck Bryant, Relationary Marketing | 10.6.16

Dan Rogers remembers listening to the original Grand Ole Opry radio show with his parents, trying to guess how large the crowd was or debating whether or not there would be a surprise guest.

“The Opry was a place you could go to in your mind on a Saturday night when you’re 8 years old and stuck in the middle of Nowhere, Illinois.”

Now almost 30 years later, Rogers is the senior marketing director at the Grand Ole Opry, and will be the featured guest at Nashville American Marketing Association Power Lunch on October 13, discussing the impact of the Opry’s storytelling opportunities on marketing.  

Rogers started as a graduate intern right after college, and hasn’t looked back since. He said The Opry presents so many unique opportunities for stories and experiences.

“It’s a place where you have all these personalities coming together,” Rogers said, “You could have Carrie Underwood listening to a bluegrass artist, or Vince Gill watching a new performer who idolized him growing up.”  

The tradition of the Opry starts with the stories artists and fans share about their unique experiences with the radio show, concerts, or personalities.

“It’s about the music, but it’s also this very special relationship between the artists and fans.”

For an establishment seeped in tradition, Rogers is trying to expand the reach of their stories through organic uses of social media by artists and fans. In the old days the only method of delivering an experience was through radio or TV. Now stars and fans interact on social media, sharing stories in real time.

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While the show might not be as prominent as it once was, the Opry is still an important staple to so many people. Rogers thinks back to watching so many up and coming artists who perform at the Opry for the first time, and invite all their family members from all over the world to see them.    

“You’re reminded of what an important part of America is right in our backyard in Nashville.”

Connect with Rogers on LinkedIn.

On October 13, Dan Rogers presents The Grand Ole Opry’s Secrets to Using Storytelling for Impact at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

 

chuck-bryant
Chuck Bryant is co-founder and CEO of Relationary Marketing, a podcast production agency that creates broadcast-quality interviews for rich content marketing, event promotion, relationship nurturing and thought leadership.

[PODCAST] Ike Pigott Presents the Case for Brand Journalism at NAMA September Power Lunch

By Kirk Bado, Guest Blogger | 8.27.16

A website for a power company does not immediately conjure images of outstanding marketing content.  

But Ike Pigott is working to alter that perception.   

Pigott is a communications strategists at Alabama Power, and he is changing the way corporations handle their news. Since 2008, he has pivoted the utility company away from simply using its website as a spot to host press releases, to now becoming a leader in the burgeoning field of brand journalism.

“Content marketing, is one of the more direct and valuable ways to reach people with a message in today’s climate… Brand journalism is a subset in content marketing,” he said.

Pigott uses the Alabama Power platform to build an audience not just focused on updates from the company, but  a mix of news and content curation for the State of Alabama. He runs the website like a traditional news outlet, telling stories that fit the brand of Alabama, instead of focusing exclusively on reiterating internal company news      

“You can’t do enough talking about yourself and develop an audience to it,” Pigott said.

Since May last year, he has focused efforts on generating content that might not directly relate to Alabama Power, but instead building an audience based on the content of their more community driven news stories.

Ike Pigott

“You’re not graded on intent, you’re graded on effectiveness,” he explained.

And the content has been very effective. After the shift, the site is getting more than 100,000 visits a month, which might not rival traditional news sites, but dwarfs other corporate news publications. By taking a more traditional news publication approach to content advertising, Alabama Power is drawing the attention of local newspapers and even Google News aggregates. Traditional media outlets are now lifting stories from his site to run them in their publications.

Pigott says he is ecstatic with the content being pushed by other outlets; to him, it is not about getting the most page views or traffic. Because Alabama Power is a public utility, his ultimate employer is the State of Alabama. The goal is marketing the larger message of Alabama to young people looking for jobs.

“They don’t have to go to Austin or Boston or Silicon Valley to have a great career, you can do it here,” he explained. “If we can tell the type of stories that reinforce that, then that’s a win for us.”

Pigott garnered this new audience by breaking down the internal silos of Alabama Power’s marketing, advertising, and design components. He’s streamlined all departments to generate content for their brand journalism. Now the company can quickly respond to the trends of its growing audience, and meet them where they are.   

“If you’re able to make a shift in a timely fashion, you are in a great position to meet them where they are going to be,” he said. “That’s the process that is going to take you – and your organization – to where you need to be.”  

Connect with Pigott on Twitter.

NAMA Sept Power Lunch

On September 8, Ike Pigott presents The Case for Brand Journalism at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, with editing support from Jess Grommet and music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

 

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Kirk Bado is a student and freelance writer at Belmont University and storyteller for Relationary Marketing, a podcast agency that produces broadcast-quality interviews to create engaging strategic content and nurture high-value relationships.

Why Marketers Should Consider Growing Their Platform with a Podcast

podcast_squareBy Jeff Brown

Chances are, you have heard more than once recently that podcasting is ripe for rapid growth.

Truth be told, people in the medium have been saying this since nearly the beginning (about 10 years). Why then should you believe now is any different? Fair question. I’m glad you asked. Read on because there’s something in this for you too.

 

 

A Little Podcasting History

Starting in 2007, podcast listening began to steadily climb, due in large part to the introduction of the smartphone. Smartphones brought with them streaming and, eventually, wireless syncing – neither of which had been possible with mp3 players like the iPod.

Prior to smartphones, you had to download content to your computer from the internet, connect your computer to your listening device (taking up precious space on the device in the process) and wait for the two to do their thing. Today, that’s no longer the case.

Smartphones have helped to break down many of the barriers to entry for most would-be podcast listeners. Listening to a podcast via your smartphone is as easy as launching the appropriate app.

The Future of Podcasting

In 2015 and beyond, a similar leap forward is beginning to take place, this time in a slightly larger “mobile” device.

Your car.

The car is already the runaway leader in podcast listening. Just like with radio, this is where most podcast listening happens – during the commute.

Until recently though, connecting your smartphone to your car’s sound system was a cumbersome choice between utilizing a cassette adapter, an FM transmitter, or auxiliary connection.

In recent months, automobile manufactures have begun to strike deals with popular podcast app makers like Stitcher, promising prominent placement of the app’s icon on new car dashboards.

Apple and Google have taken this a step further. Apple has begun to partner with automobile makers to include its new CarPlay as part of the dashboard experience, allowing the driver to propagate their favorite smartphone apps to their dashboard the moment they sit down. Not to be outdone, Google has similar plans for Android users with Android Auto.

Now is the Time to Strike

These leaps, I believe, will help to put podcast listening at the fingertips of millions of people who previously wouldn’t have given podcasts a second thought. Just like the DVR has done for television watching at home, apps like Stitcher and Apple’s native Podcast App – in the dash – will bring time-shifted listening to drivers everywhere.

It’s primarily for this reason you as a content creator should seriously consider offering that content in audio form. Audio content is the most intimate form your content can take. It’s also the only way your audience can consume your content and not have to stop whatever they’re doing in order to enjoy it.

Think about it. If I want to read your blog post or watch your video, I’ve got to shut everything else out. Your readers’ lives aren’t going to get less busy any time soon. Why not offer your content in a format that allows her to easily consume it while driving, working out at the gym or on the treadmill, or while doing chores around the house?

A Podcasting Case Study

I know of one blogger who recently decided to repurpose his existing blog content into an “audio blog.” In other words, he began releasing podcast episodes that were nothing more than him reading some of his past blog posts.

Within two months of launching this new show, he reported seeing seven times the number of downloads of his new podcast than he ever did in visits to his blog.

Personally, launching a podcast of my own is the smartest thing I’ve ever done. It has served as a launching pad to so many wonderful opportunities this past year alone.

For example, I was invited to speak at the Podcast Movement Conference in Dallas this past August. My podcast was the calling card that allowed me to team up with popular authors like Jeff Goins and successful podcasters like John Lee Dumas for lucrative joint venture webinars.

It’s also enabled me to launch a coaching business, and much more.

Simply put, a well down podcast gives you the opportunity for more exposure in the shortest period of time than any other medium I know.

So What’s In It For You?

There are a number of resources available to help you get started. In fact, this Tuesday I’ll be joining forces with Dave Delaney for an all day workshop called Start Podcasting Today.

There are a few spots left and we’d love to have you. Use the discount code ‘NAMA100’ for $100 off registration while tickets remain.

To learn more about the conference, click here.

Or just go ahead and register here.