Nossi College of Art launches new UX/UI Design program

By Libby Funke, Guest Blogger | 5.24.17

Improving one’s professional development isn’t always the most exciting thing to check off your professional to do list.

Everyone has been part of team building exercises, multi-day conventions to learn the latest (insert latest thing here) or classes making you more proficient in Excel, Word, or even social media. Rarely do these opportunities leave you feeling empowered to use or share these new skills.

Nossi College of Art wants to help change how you make an impact on your career.

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Starting in the fall, Nossi College will offer a 16-week UX/UI Design certificate to help marketers, business owners, executives, and those looking to dip their toes into a new career field, find useful skillsets that can be transferred to the professional world.

UX/UI Design is in high demand, not only in Middle Tennessee, but also across the country. More companies are asking new hires to have knowledge in the tech arena, specifically around web development and design.

With hundreds of thousands of vacant jobs in the tech field, and an average salary of $90,000*, Nossi College saw this need when creating our Bachelor and Associate Web and Interactive degrees. Because of this need, we began researching and created a perceptive, 16-week UX/UI Design certificate course.

Whether you are a complete beginner, you have been dabbling with code and want to become more efficient, or you are proficient and want to learn about theories behind your design, this 16-week course was made for you.

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You will have an opportunity to learn Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator skills on top of web design skills and by the time you have completed the certification, you can take measurable skills back to your job or you can start thinking about changing your path altogether.

Nossi College is also offering NAMA members an exclusive scholarship opportunity for half off tuition.

Interested in that scholarship opportunity? Simply sign up here for your chance to be considered.

During the certificate program, the NAMA scholarship winner will post to social media periodically, create blogs about their experience and give a testimonial at the end of the program.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to Libby Funke with Nossi College. Call her at 615.514.2787 or email her at LFunke@nossi.edu.

 

*According to a recent report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

Volunteer Spotlight: Knight Stivender

Knight Stivender

Knight Stivender
CEO, Girls To The Moon
Director of Client Success, Alcott Marketing Science
Volunteer, NAMA Marketing Technology SIG Committee

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I joined NAMA six years ago when I was transitioning from a career in Journalism to a career in Marketing and Advertising. I found it to be a nice blend of learning and networking.

You currently serve (or have served) on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I’ve served in a variety of board roles, including Communications Chair, Programming Chair, and Marketing Technology SIG Chair. I initially volunteered for the same reason I think a lot of people do – because a friend roped me into it! But I stuck around because NAMA has been tremendously valuable in my own career, and I feel I owe it to the organization to give back as much as I can.

What has been (or was) your proudest moment in this role?
When I was Programming Chair, my team and I brought in one of NAMA’s most diverse and inclusive lineups of luncheon speakers. I’m proud of that, though I think we can always do better and should be constantly thinking of ways we can be more reflective of our growing and changing community.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I’ve met people who have become clients, sponsors, mentors, employees, and friends. I could literally put a dollar value on parts of it, but that would be giving away trade secrets. 🙂 And besides that, the most important parts transcend monetization.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
The diversity of industries and professional experiences of the members, speakers and event attendees sets NAMA apart from other professional organizations of which I’ve been a part. I hear a lot of people say this, and I’ve found it to be the case myself.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
My team and I were finalists for a Pulitzer Prize for our breaking news coverage of the Nashville floods in 2010. We knew almost immediately that Saturday the rains started that we were in for a historic weather event, and my own neighborhood was one where people were evacuated in boats. It was incredible.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
You’ll learn a lot – from both a professional standpoint as well as a “who’s who” of the Nashville marketing, advertising and agency scene.

Volunteer Spotlight: Tim Earnhart

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Tim Earnhart
Founder/CEO of Werkshop Branding
NAMA Board Member, Chair of Entertainment & Sports Marketing SIG

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I re-joined NAMA in 2014 as a board member. However, our company had been a member since 2008. NAMA is a great place to find industry thought leadership, networking opportunities, potential business, and amazing friendships.

You currently serve on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I enjoy giving of my time to valuable organizations that I personally will benefit from. NAMA provides multiple volunteer opportunities in various areas. It was easy for me to find a spot where I thought I could be of benefit to the organization. 

What has been (or was) your proudest moment in this role?
Upon joining the board in 2014, I initially served on the volunteer committee as co-chair and then chair. During this time I talked and met with countless professionals who wanted to get involved with NAMA and volunteer just like me. It was very fulfilling for me to meet these people and learn more about their passions and what drove them to want to get involved with NAMA.

Within the last few months, NAMA has launched the Entertainment & Sports Marketing SIG – their newest special interest group – and I have agreed to chair that SIG. It only makes sense for NAMA to have such a group given the impact both entertainment and sports have on Nashville.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
The past three years have been extremely positive for me. I have learned so much interacting with fellow board members, members, and speakers/panelists. You get out of anything what you put in it. I live in Kentucky, so I’ve made it a commitment and priority to attend as many of the NAMA events as possible.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
NAMA is diverse. It’s that simple. Meaning, those who are involved with NAMA come from various professional disciplines like marketing, branding, advertising, communications, PR, social & digital media, C-suite, management, and even business ownership.

You will find a great mix of agency and corporate. I love this about NAMA. The diversity of our membership is great. This is what I think sets us apart from other groups.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
I’m what they call a serial entrepreneur, so I have had many memorable experiences. I’ve been a co-founder or partner of seven start-ups/companies over the last 16 years. I enjoy the excitement and challenges behind launching a new brand or growing an existing business.

I was honored in 2004 as the Small Business Person of the Year by the Bowling Green, KY Chamber of Commerce. My most proud moment was in 2012 when I was honored by Junior Achievement USA with the national Impact Award for my service to that non-profit organization. I’ve served on a local JA board for 20 years. 

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
Our time as professionals is precious. However, if you make a commitment to NAMA and all that it has to offer, it will be time well spent. You get out of it what you put in it. There’s plenty of other organizations and events in Nashville that can consume your time. However, if you are at all in the global world of marketing, you need to be a part of NAMA.

Volunteer Spotlight: Karen Stone

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Karen Stone
Director of Marketing, Amplion
Programming volunteer (2003-2004)
Programming Chair (2004-2005)
President Elect (2005-2006)
President (2006-2007)
Past President – CEA Award (2007-2008)
AMA Professional Chapters Council (2008-2014)
AMA Professional Chapters Council President (2011-2014)
AMA National Audit and Finance Committee (2014-2016)

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I joined NAMA to quickly increase my marketing knowledge. When I joined the organization in 2003, I was transitioning from my career in broadcast news and needed a way to rapidly ramp up my understanding of marketing principles and best practices. NAMA became my go to resource and still is today. The programming is consistently outstanding and my professional network is my lifeline.

You have served on NAMA’s Board in the past. Why did you decide to volunteer?
At my very first meeting, I made a programming suggestion to the current president. I don’t recall exactly what it was, but it must have been somewhat intriguing, because he asked to continue the conversation over coffee. Before I knew it, I was tapped to become programming chair and was hooked.

I learned that being a volunteer provided a valuable test environment for my budding marketing career. Every volunteer experience was a chance to learn something new and collaborate with incredible marketing minds from a variety of industries. Many of the people I met through those experiences became mentors who helped shape my career and are now some of my most cherished friends.

Having volunteered with NAMA and with the AMA at the national level for more than 13 years, I can tell you that I have received far more than I have given.

What has been the proudest moment as a volunteer?
My proudest moment by far was in 2008 when NAMA entered the national AMA Chapter of Excellence Awards for the first time ever and won first runner up.

It was my year as president of NAMA and the culmination of several years of work alongside a dynamic group of volunteers. Accepting that coveted award on behalf of the many hardworking volunteers who believed in the vision and mission and poured their heart and soul into the chapter to receive that validation and recognition was thrilling.

Since then, NAMA has grown to be such a respected force locally and nationally. I am very proud of the legacy of leadership in this organization and the committed volunteers that kick it up a notch year after year.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
NAMA is most definitely one of the best decisions of my professional career. I can honestly say I wouldn’t be where I am today without having joined this organization and invested my time as a volunteer.

The knowledge I gained and the friendships that formed laid a strong foundation for me to grow personally and professionally. From landing jobs and informing my marketing strategy to growing my leadership skills, there is no doubt NAMA has played a pivotal role in my career and continues to do so even today.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
The people and strong programming are two of the biggest differences in my mind. I visited several other organizations in town before deciding to join NAMA. There were none where I felt the warmth and immediate sense of belonging I felt here.

When I attend events or even just attend a mixer, I always take home some new piece of info I can use. I would say that’s a pretty strong ROI!

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
I’ve had so many wonderful experiences in my career, it’s difficult to choose just one, but if I have to narrow it down, I would say my current role has probably been the most fulfilling. Being a healthcare marketer, I get to go to work every day in a mission-driven technology company focused on improving the consistency and quality of patient care in hospitals.

The work we are doing at Amplion is transformational and disruptive. Developing the inbound marketing strategy and a thought leadership platform that is attracting attention from many of the top hospitals and hospital systems in the country gets me very excited.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
I’ve already mentioned this a number of times, but I would say as a marketer, there is no greater way to build your knowledge and network than being a part of NAMA.

Volunteering, in particular, can enrich your membership experience and your career in valuable ways that cannot be replicated any other way. Of course, like anything, it’s only as good as the quality of your investment. I’ve found the more you give, the more you gain. After 13 years of AMA membership and volunteer experience, I think I’m a pretty good case study for the benefits of volunteer service.

Volunteer Spotlight: Emily Fay

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Emily Fay
Marketing Manager, Remar, Inc.
Secretary (2015)
Board Member at Large (2012-2013)
Collegiate Relation Chair (2010-2012)

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I moved to Nashville in 2007 on a whim, I had no job, just my best friend from 3rd grade. As a member of the University of Nebraska – Lincoln AMA chapter I knew, if I wanted to meet the top marketers in town I needed to attend NAMA’s events.

You served on NAMA’s Board for several years. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I wasn’t really looking for more activities to get involved in when I was asked to help with the Collegiate Relations committee. However, I am a strong believer in the more you put into an organization the more you get out of it.

I also felt that having been a member of a collegiate chapter in the past, gave me some insight into what students would need and want from our chapter.

What was your proudest moment in your role as Collegiate Relations Chair?
That is easy! Dreaming up and executing the Marketing the Marketer event.

This event gave students the opportunity to connect with Marketers and HR professionals. They got to ask questions about everything from what it is like to work in Marketing to what to expect in an interview.

The first year we did this, I was expecting that maybe 15-20 students would be there, but we sold out of tickets and 40 students showed up!

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I don’t know where my career would be without NAMA. I have found both of my marketing positions in Nashville through this organization. The first role was an Account Manager at Allegiant Direct, Inc., and that job found me through the NAMA job board. The second role, my current position at Remar, was found through a NAMA Mixer.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
NAMA has a good mix of marketing folks, that are excited to learn from each other.

This is organization is fantastic for networking. The best part is that if your networking skill level doesn’t matter. If you are new to it, someone will guide you along. If networking is your expertise, there is always someone new and interesting to meet at NAMA.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
It is hard for me to pin point just one experience. There are highlights from every marketing role I have had. The one that is sticking out to me right now hasn’t happened yet. But, in a couple weeks the non-profit organization I started, Nashville Huskers, will host its 100th football watch party.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
I said this before, but the more you put into NAMA the more you get out of it, and in order to volunteer with NAMA, you need to be a member.

When you volunteer with NAMA you make connections with incredible marketers, and they can actually see the quality of your work. For me, when it came to finding a job, the recommendation from someone who I had volunteered with was a factor in getting the job I have today.

NAMA Member Brings Husker Fans Together for a Kick-off with a Cause

By Katie Soltas, NAMA Blogger | 10.30.16

Remar, Inc.’s marketing manager and longtime NAMA member, Emily Fay, simply wanted to bond with a few Nebraska Cornhusker fans during football season without leaving her new home of Nashville.

What she started became more than a small group of game day buddies, but a movement that has generated thousands of dollars in college scholarships for Nashvillians and has pumped nearly $240,000 into Music City’s economy through food and beverage sales.

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Fay moved to Nashville in 2007 from Nebraska. In 2009, she performed digital research and recruiting on Facebook and LinkedIn, inviting Husker alumni to watch the football season opener at what was formerly Closing Bell on Demonbreun Hill. Twenty people confirmed their attendance, but 80 fans showed up to the first game – greatly exceeding Fay’s expectations.

Since then, the “Nashville Huskers” migrated to several locations in the city until they landed a permanent home, the Tin Roof 2 in Cool Springs, where they have met the past four seasons.

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More than 150 fans gather each weekend, and Fay has kept detailed records showing the group’s annual financial impact for the establishments where they congregate. Although it can be challenging for restaurants to meet the needs of the large group, the herd brings in up to $40,000 in revenue each football season.

But for Fay, watching the games wasn’t enough.

Through merchandise sales and other means, she led the group in raising $18,000 over the past five years for the University of Nebraska Legends scholarship that goes to three deserving Middle Tennessee college applicants every year.

College football brings the Nashville Huskers together, but the professional networking and relationship-building opportunities is what keeps the group alive and thriving.

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During our interview, Fay rattles off several long-lost relatives and friends that found each other through the group, including her mother and a childhood friend who rekindled their friendship. Two Husker alumni fell in love (let’s assume over beer and wings) during a season and are now married. One Nashville Husker’s friends from Purdue came every year when their team played Nebraska. Last year, he tragically passed away from cancer and his friends still came to Nashville during the Purdue game to honor him.

“Everyone in the group knows each other now, and we are all connected somehow,” said Fay, who is looking forward to their 100th watch party on Nov. 19. “I never imagined it would turn into a true community.”

[PODCAST] Finding your personal value with Jennifer Way

By Chuck Bryant, Relationary Marketing | 10.27.16

Jennifer Way wants to help make marketers their own biggest advocates by revealing their personal value.

“Your resume should be the Cliff Notes of your values, not a job description,” Way said.

Way is a consultant and president of Way Solutions. Her company has worked with Disney, Amazon, and Honda to help get the most out of their employees. She’ll be helping guests unlock the power of their personal value at NAMA’s Power Lunch on Thursday, Nov. 3.

“Unleashing the power of your personal value is about learning how to identify the key factors that will get you the recognition and rewards you need,” Way said. “What employer doesn’t want more value from an employee?”

Way said that finding personal value is not about expanding any more effort, but instead is about understanding dynamics in your work system.

People in the workplace don’t learn how to be personal advocates on their own. Instead they learn slowly from other’s mistakes, when really they need to look at themselves objectively and put themselves in the opposite role, according to Way. This is where marketers have a unique advantage.  

“They understand exactly how to look at themselves objectively in a business-to-business situation, but feel awkward turning that marketing eye on themselves.”

Connect with Way on LinkedIn.

On Nov. 3, Jennifer Way presents Unlock the Power of Your Value at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

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Chuck Bryant is co-founder and CEO of Relationary Marketing, a podcast production agency that creates broadcast-quality interviews for rich content marketing, event promotion, relationship nurturing and thought leadership.

The Cheers Effect

By Chelsea Kallman, NAMA Blogger | 10.25. 16

Sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows your name.

If the Cheers television show theme song starts playing in your head then we’re on the right track. Not only is this an incredible TV show, but it’s also a great example of why knowing your customers is the best solution for growing your business.

Whether you company lends itself to a daily customer or even a yearly interaction, you can glean wisdom from the beloved TV show.

Customers who feel known and appreciated are going to come back time and time again.

I know sales representatives at clothing stores are paid to tell me I look great in a dress, but when they say it in a way that I believe it, you better believe I’m coming back again – not just for another great outfit, but for the affirmation and experience of feeling like a superstar.

Take a second and think about the opposite.

When you go into a coffee shop and you’re not greeted – you’re immediately put off. You feel like you’re not cool enough for the space or that you don’t know enough to order from their menu. How likely are you to go back? Zero percent.

Business Grow has an article about turning online influence into offline results, and in it Mark Schaefer makes the point that “relationships with companies are formed through interactions over time.”

Your business will grow when people you know are talking about it and when your regular customers feel known, appreciated, and like they’re a part of something.

In short, The Cheers Effect.

To be effective in this means you have to actually care.

One of the phrases Schaefer uses is being “authentically kind.” You have to be willing to start the conversation and emotionally invest with whomever you’re trying to influence. This looks like being helpful even when you don’t think you’ll get something in return. It means being trustworthy. He says small interactions like these lead to larger engagements.

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Ask yourself this: Why do you go to the same bar over and over again? Maybe you like the food. Maybe the prices are great. But maybe at the end of the day it’s because you’re know,n and you can go in and be taken care of by someone who remembers your name, your favorite drink, and maybe even that you like two sides of blue cheese dressing with your french fries.

I found my Cheers when I started regularly going to a local barbeque restaurant. I would sit at the bar each time, and I quickly realized I kept getting the same bartender. He didn’t talk too much. And really, he didn’t need to. But he would make small talk about music, what was on TV, or just ask me what I was up to that day.

Fast forward several months. Now he is my favorite bartender in Nashville. All the small talk led to more conversation, and now he’s a part of my friend group. He has since gotten a new job, and you know how often I go to that BBQ restaurant now? Maybe once since he has left. Instead I go to the new bar where he works.

Having employees who are willing to make connections with your customers will, in turn, make your business so much more money.

Working in the coffee business, I get regulars who come in every single day.

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It’s hard not to get to know someone when you see them five days a week. Many of these regulars have made such personal connections with the staff that they end up getting hired when they’re in need of a job, or they’re invited to staff bonfires at our houses. We get beers with them after work.

This concept doesn’t just apply to the hospitality industry though. I believe The Cheers Effect applies to every type of business. This goes back to our blog post about how being nice is always the best option.

At the end of the day, it’s about making a personal connection.

Read this article about how one car dealership did this extremely well. They were genuine, friendly, and they just acted like themselves. When you’re a car dealer, you’re not going to get repeat customers daily, but the shop gave its customers roadtrip inspiration and even great food suggestions. They were about more than just cars.

When you put time and energy into making your customers feel appreciated, it shows. It’s worth the work because at the end of the day, you’ll have an incredible reputation and a committed customer base. These two attributes lead to word-of-mouth marketing that is invaluable to any business.

Eventually enough people start talking, and it draws a crowd.

Because sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows your name and they’re always glad you came. You wanna go where you can see people are all the same. You wanna go where everybody knows your name.

Volunteer Spotlight: Julie McReynolds

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Julie McReynolds
Marketing Consultant, Julie McReynolds Consulting
NAMA Historian

What prompted you to join NAMA?
After being in corporate marketing for eight years I went back to school to get my MBA to advance my career. I had been involved in the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and loved how open and welcoming they were/are and that they really wanted to connect others to opportunities but there wasn’t a focus for marketers.

I really was looking to broaden my marketing network and Career Services recommended I join my local AMA chapter. With my previous experience in other organizations in Nashville, I was not too keen on this idea. Those organizations were not welcoming at all. It was very clear that it was about titles and advancement in their career with no desire to help others.

In May of 2010, I attended my first NAMA event. I knew absolutely no one. I’m never one to shy away from the unknown and wasn’t really expecting anything special. The very first person I met was past president and Achievement In Marketing Awards committee lead, Kerry Price. During that time I also met then-volunteer chair Holly Grenvicz. Between the two of them, they made me feel like I was part of the AMA family. As soon as I left the luncheon I joined NAMA and started in my first volunteer role on the AIM committee with Kerry Price, Julie May, and current president Mary Pollman.

You currently serve on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
This is my fifth year on the Board and I have been lucky to be able to bounce around to different roles. The warm welcome that I got at that first luncheon really made me want to help those ladies out by being part of the NAMA family where I could continue the legacy by also help other marketers get connected.

What has been your proudest moment in this role?
Being awarded NAMA Volunteer of the Year – 2012-2013 year!

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
WOW, that’s a loaded question! Included in the volunteer work that I have done with NAMA I have also volunteered with the AMA in several roles; on the social media committee for Leadership Summit and as a judge in the National Collegiate Marketing Awards competition. Being able to network nationally has helped me refine my skills and gain credibility which has helped me grow my business.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
It is welcoming and everyone understands that marketing is growing and changing so we all welcome each other’s knowledge of the different facets and industries.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
I’m sure there are memorable things about my career but my memories stem around helping others….humans or of the four-legged-furry kind. Ha!

I am super passionate about several things: mentoring college students, and connecting others. Over the years I have mentored a number of college students through the AMA nationally and NAMA locally. Every time I teach a student about managing their digital brand, connect someone with a potential employer/internship opportunity, or I speak to a class and then see students at networking events I get really excited. It is so important for students to network and build their online and offline professional brand presence as soon as possible.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
I think anytime anyone can expand their network is a good thing. NAMA allows anyone either new to Nashville, a new college graduate, or just new to marketing to connect with industry executives who can positively impact the trajectory of their life. There are plenty of people in the organization that are willing to help if asked.

 

Member Spotlight: Jeffrey Horne

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Jeffrey Horne
Communicator in Chief, Rustici Software
Co-founder/Director, Moxie Flock Social Media Marketing

IT Specialist, NAMA Communications Committee

What prompted you to join NAMA?
A couple of years ago, my good friends, Knight Stivender and Courtenay Rogers, who were on the NAMA board (and still are), were looking for somebody to help with the technical side of Communications. They asked me if I’d be the co-chair of Communications, and of course, I jumped at the opportunity.

You currently serve on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
My skillset naturally lends itself to the role that I play in NAMA as IT Specialist. I’m a marketer, but I also have a considerable amount of tech skills — that means I can fill a particular gap at NAMA that not a lot of people can.

I also love meeting new people, and hearing the story of people’s lives (personal and professional). I love spreading the word about how helpful NAMA can be to other marketers, and connecting people to resources that can be helpful from a career standpoint.

What has been your proudest moment in this role on the NAMA board?
When I first started as Communications Co-Chair, we realized that our website needed an overhaul. I managed the process of the redesign and coding of our new/existing site, made sure that it was easy to update, and ensured that it promoted the material that we find useful.

As a volunteer, coordinating the design of a brand new site wasn’t a small task, but it was definitely worth it.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
NAMA has allowed me to meet a lot of new people, and opened a lot of doors for me. The simple fact of being involved with NAMA means that you have a wide network of resources from which to pull. Being involved with a professional organization like NAMA means that networking, learning, and growing become much easier.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
I was recently asked to represent NAMA on a panel about various professional groups in Nashville. One of the questions was “If your organization were an animal, which would it be?” I thought about this question a lot, because it’s a weird question. For two reasons, I came to the conclusion that NAMA would be an elephant.

  1. Elephants find food together. When they need resources, they pool together and figure it out collectively – just like NAMA.
  2. Elephants raise their young collectively. When a new member is added to the group, the entire group chips in to make sure the new family member is safe and taken care of – just like NAMA.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
Going to the regional retreat in Charlotte, N.C. was a lot of fun — I was able to meet a lot of other regional NAMA board members, and share a lot of ideas.

But, the most memorable experiences that I’ve had are the honors that have been bestowed on me. They align directly with my time on the NAMA board. In 2014, I was honored to win the Nashville Business Journal’s CMO of the Year award, and in 2015, I won the Nashville Tech Council’s Marketing Innovator of the Year award.

There really aren’t words for how good it feels to be recognized for hard work.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
NAMA is the best organization in Nashville that helps with educating, connecting, and providing resources for marketers in Nashville. The events, mixers, and opportunities that NAMA opens up for marketers is unmatched in Nashville.

Whether you’re a seasoned marketer or new to the city/profession, one of the most valuable things that you can do for your career is to get involved with NAMA.