Atata might just be your Huckleberry

By Emma Everett, Guest Blogger | 7.25.17

Tombstone

I’m Your Huckleberry

Remember that line from the movie, “Tombstone?”  Doc Holiday catches up with nefarious Ringo and delivers one of the most quoted lines in Western movie history. And, just in case you didn’t see the movie or understand what Doc is talking about, Doc is basically saying, “When I shoot– I don’t miss.”

In Nashville’s wild west of product and software development companies, there’s a new gunslinger in town. (Did I go too far with the western analogy?)

Atata is now on the scene and they just might be your Huckleberry. How will you know? You might start by asking yourself a few questions:

  • Do I need a rapid prototype or MVP developed?
  • Do I need wireframes for a new app I’m creating?
  • Do I need a software product fully developed from UX to product road-mapping?
  • Do I need a software expert(s) to come in and help me accelerate my build or help me get through a pinch?

If the answer to any of the above questions is yes, then there’s a good chance Atata is your huckleberry.

Don’t worry, though.  We’re not going to oversell you or take on a project unless we’re confident we will hit a bullseye. If you’re looking for a general how-to guide on how to go about hiring a software development company, there are some great resources out there. And, rather than reinvent the wheel, we’ll simply share our favorite one with you.

So, how is Atata the same/different from the other “gunslingers” in town?

  • 100% Nashville talent
  • Senior level team
  • Transparency
  • Flexibility to pivot and meet a unique need

Atata’s core services include:

  • Project-based application development
  • Product development
  • UX/UI
  • Data science (i.e. machine learning, predictive modeling, natural language processing, statistical analysis)
  • Staff Augmentation

Since Atata is a young company, we’re interested in hearing from you about your needs when it comes to application builds and software development.  Drop us a line either through our website or by emailing emma.everett@atata.co.  More information can be found at atata.co.

Nossi’s Photography Certificate Program will help serious hobbyists and company employees

By Leslie Kerr, Guest Blogger | 7.6.17

A new Photography Certificate Program at Nossi College of Art will help serious hobbyists or business owners and employees who need to take better pictures for their company web sites and social media pages.

Starting this fall, the 16-week program will meet four hours per week at night. Professional photography instructors will utilize Nossi’s facilities to teach camera functions, lighting techniques, studio etiquette and software programs for post-production needs.

“It’s going to be fun, intensive and we’re going to be moving fast,” said Nossi Photography Coordinator Tom Stanford. “We anticipate having very motivated students who want to come in and, in four short months, really improve their skill sets.”

A major advantage for certificate students will be access to Nossi’s 2,500 square foot photo studio, the largest instructional studio in the southeast. They will also receive focused instruction to process their work in a professional setting. The course will be structured in segments that will include some beginning photography, software instruction, advanced photography and cataloging.

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“The idea is to shoot a little bit, learn about how to process those images, shoot more sophisticated stuff, and then learn how to do post-production in the Adobe programs Photoshop and Lightroom,” Stanford said. “Lightroom allows you to organize your photos in a logical way. It also allows you to make changes on photographs and, at any time in the future, go back and undo those changes or edit further.”

While classes are structured, students will be expected to shoot most of their projects outside the classroom. As techniques are explained, outside assignments will be assigned accordingly to help students hone a specific technique, according to Stanford.

Another important element of Nossi’s new photography certificate program is the partnership with Dury’s, a Nashville photography company established in 1882. Part of Dury’s mission is to help customers learn how to use their photography equipment most effectively.

According to Cyrus Vatandoost, Executive Vice President of Nossi College, a partnership between Dury’s and Nossi College is the perfect collaboration.

“Dury’s and Nossi have had a longstanding relationship,” Vatandoost said. “We at Nossi want to support the local photography community and Dury’s has the same vision. They work with our students on camera and lighting options and Dury’s owner Charles Small been a member of Nossi’s photography advisory board for a decade. They help us understand what’s new in photography equipment and what is available for students.”

Nossi’s photography certificate program will offer Dury’s customers a way to advance, either as a hobbyist or staff photographer.

“It’s a two-way street,” Vatandoost said. “Nossi will share knowledge of skill and technique while Dury’s offers insight into available equipment. Their experts will be able to offer suggestions on how to use certain cameras.”

Vatandoost hastened to add that the certificate program is open to anyone with an interest, not just Dury’s customers.

“This certificate will serve many markets,” he said. “Some serious hobbyists already have equipment, have learned all they can on their own and need someone to take them to the next level. Some students may want to start a small full- or part-time photography business and they will benefit from additional skills that we can teach them. Then there are those who work in corporate or business environments who find themselves now being the social media person for their company. This will help them and their employers.”

The Photography Certificate Program will begin in Fall 2017. Course and admissions information is available at www.nossi.edu.

 

Nossi College of Art launches new UX/UI Design program

By Libby Funke, Guest Blogger | 5.24.17

Improving one’s professional development isn’t always the most exciting thing to check off your professional to do list.

Everyone has been part of team building exercises, multi-day conventions to learn the latest (insert latest thing here) or classes making you more proficient in Excel, Word, or even social media. Rarely do these opportunities leave you feeling empowered to use or share these new skills.

Nossi College of Art wants to help change how you make an impact on your career.

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Starting in the fall, Nossi College will offer a 16-week UX/UI Design certificate to help marketers, business owners, executives, and those looking to dip their toes into a new career field, find useful skillsets that can be transferred to the professional world.

UX/UI Design is in high demand, not only in Middle Tennessee, but also across the country. More companies are asking new hires to have knowledge in the tech arena, specifically around web development and design.

With hundreds of thousands of vacant jobs in the tech field, and an average salary of $90,000*, Nossi College saw this need when creating our Bachelor and Associate Web and Interactive degrees. Because of this need, we began researching and created a perceptive, 16-week UX/UI Design certificate course.

Whether you are a complete beginner, you have been dabbling with code and want to become more efficient, or you are proficient and want to learn about theories behind your design, this 16-week course was made for you.

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You will have an opportunity to learn Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator skills on top of web design skills and by the time you have completed the certification, you can take measurable skills back to your job or you can start thinking about changing your path altogether.

Nossi College is also offering NAMA members an exclusive scholarship opportunity for half off tuition.

Interested in that scholarship opportunity? Simply sign up here for your chance to be considered.

During the certificate program, the NAMA scholarship winner will post to social media periodically, create blogs about their experience and give a testimonial at the end of the program.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to Libby Funke with Nossi College. Call her at 615.514.2787 or email her at LFunke@nossi.edu.

 

*According to a recent report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. 

[PODCAST] Company culture as marketing with Buffer’s Courtney Seiter

By Chuck Bryant | 5.3.17

Sometimes, the way a company upholds its values can be just as valuable a marketing point as its product, and perhaps nobody knows that better than Buffer Director of People Courtney Seiter, who will be presenting “Company Culture as Marketing” at NAMA Power Lunch on May 4.  

Buffer is a platform for scheduling, sharing and analyzing social media for small businesses, pursuing a two-pronged mission: In addition to giving people a greater voice on social media, Buffer also aims to create the future of work.

“It’s a little bit of a lofty mission there, and it’s kind of up to interpretation sometimes, but we often will talk about what the future of work looks like and how we can get there and how we can help other people talk about that and have those conversations to get there too,” Seiter said.

In order to accomplish this goal, Buffer takes radical approaches to traditional workplace practices.

First, its more than 75 team members are fully remote, with employees living across the world, fostering a global community of both flexibility and creative problem solving.

“We have to create unique ways to work together. If I want to talk to Adnan in Sri Lanka and I want to talk to Hannah in the UK, we’ve got some timezone things, we’ve got some asynchronous communications to overcome,” Seiter said.

Second, Buffer seeks to pioneer a culture of transparency, maintaining measures that not only keep everyone up to date on happenings in the workspace, but giving customers information access as well.

“We have a set of ten values that guide everything we do. One of those is ‘Default to transparency.’ That means, to me, unless there’s a clear tangible reason why you wouldn’t share something within the team and possibly to the wider public, go ahead and share it,” Seiter said. “For us that has created a really wonderful situation where there are no secrets on the team as far as how we work, as far as how we get paid, as far as why we price our product the way we do. And there are no secrets between us and our community and us and our customers.”

In one of its biggest moves of transparency, Buffer began making salaries public in 2013, publishing income numbers for every team member. This move, Seiter said, was a reaction to the lack of guidance available for deciding salaries in tech.

“The idea is when we began to build Buffer in the very early days, there’s a lot of high-level advice on how to pay people, how to structure benefits, but there wasn’t a whole lot for our founders to look at — it was really in the weeds– about how to structure pay and how do you pay people and make sure it’s equitable,” she said.

The move was anxiety-inducing for some team members who were concerned about how people would react once the information was available. However, in the years since Buffer published the numbers, it has proved itself a blueprint for more fair pay and applications to the company have increased by 40 percent.

In addition to transparent salaries, Buffer also allows for email conversations between two or more people to be viewed by any other members of the company, allowing for email trails to be traced back and referenced by anyone who needs them.

Employees also take turns helping out with customer support, allowing them to take part in other means of external transparency as well, showing customers how their money is being spent, and, in Seiter’s experience, seeing how much people appreciate the level of transparency the company upholds.

“The idea is that you as a Buffer customer should know where your money is going to. We respect our customers enough to recognize that’s information they want to know and that it will benefit them and make our relationship stronger to have that knowledge,” she said.

While it takes significant time and effort for a company to implement radical workplace changes like widespread transparency, Seiter said that companies can start by looking into the heart of the company and what drives its mission. Without these goals, it can difficult for companies to put into place future-thinking ways of changing the workplace.

“One thing that people, founders and organizations can do is to look to their values. If they do have values, they tend to be written on a wall or in the breakroom or somewhere not referred to all that often,” Seiter said.

Once those values are identified or created, founders should look for creative new ways to hold people accountable for making progress in company culture, backing them up with policy and experimenting with new methods.

This isn’t something that can be done without a passion behind it, however, Seiter said.

“It has to be genuine and authentic. I don’t think you can start out in this mission thinking ‘Oh, if we share this, the New York Times is going to want our story.’ It has to come form an organic and helpful and authentic and genuine place. People will recognize that and will respond to that. People can also recognize that false note really, really quickly,” she said.

But, if done with a genuine and creative spirit, radical changes in company culture can be a piece of the marketing platform in and of themselves, attracting customers and personalities that are interested and excited to contribute.

“People want to see companies doing good. People want to align themselves with mission, with values they believe in. You have so many choices today; you can choose from any number of products to solve any sort of issue for you, but with that choice there needs to be something else you hang onto. I think values are quickly becoming the thing that I personally choose when I choose a product or a service. And a lot of folks feel that way: They want something more,” Seiter said.

For more information about Buffer, visit them online at buffer.com and check out their transparency blog at open.bufferapp.com.

Seiter will be the keynote speaker at NAMA Power Lunch’s Company Culture as Marketing featuring Buffer on May 4. Register now.

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

 

Nashville’s Super Bowl Moment

By Samuel Cowden, Guest Blogger | 2.26.17

The Super Bowl is still quite visible in our rearview mirror, and we have been exposed to the year’s most exquisite examples of advertising.

The big game was an opportunity for brands to impress, to excite, and to entice. With advertising spots, even the shortest, running bills of over a million dollars, brands carefully considered their advertising — making sure to make the most of an opportunity, and audience, that only comes once a year.

Here’s the thing, Nashville is having it’s Super Bowl moment. The nation is watching us, waiting to see what we have to offer.

Unfortunately — in the business world — we don’t have much to show them because our approach to advertising is about as refined as a used car salesman’s.

In 2012, my business partner and I moved to Nashville from a small town 20 minutes outside of Dayton, Ohio to start a commercial animation studio. Nashville seemed like the perfect place to begin — fertile ground, as they say — due to its burgeoning economic landscape.

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Only a few years after the economic crisis of 2008, Nashville was growing faster than almost any city in the country and we were looking to capitalize — and we did. Nearly five years later, we’re still here — and doing pretty well.

There’s just one catch, less than ten percent of our business will originate in Nashville this year.

In the beginning, we played the game. We paid ourselves next to nothing, taking every job that came our way — no matter the budget — just to get our foothold. Our studio began to grow. We hired new employees and started making livable salaries. We were given the opportunity to work with some of the biggest advertising agencies in the world as well as directly with businesses like Bad Robot, Amazon, and CBS.

However, Nashville advertisers quickly began to balk at our budgets. When working in Nashville we were constantly face-to-face with a question — make great work or make a living? We were at war with a culture of low expectations.

Of all the obstacles to overcome, low expectations may be the hardest. Once somebody tells you that what you’re doing is good enough, it becomes indescribably harder to be convinced otherwise.

Well, here’s your wake-up call. Here’s somebody telling you that the rest of the country is passing you by while you’re busy pinching pennies.

On the other hand, maybe Nashville isn’t ready for its Super Bowl moment. Maybe we should tell the world to avert their eyes for a few years while we figure out this whole advertising thing. Maybe we just need a little time.

As I write this, I’m sitting in seat 15F on a plane bound for Los Angeles, followed by stops in Seattle and San Francisco — places that, when given their moment, didn’t fumble the ball.

 

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Samuel Cowden is the founder and Executive Producer of IV, an award-winning animation studio focused on creating beautiful videos about the human narrative for design-conscious brands including IDEO, Edelman, CBS, Amazon, and Google.

Volunteer Spotlight: Austin Harrison

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Austin Harrison
Relationship Director, Identity Visuals
NAMA Board Member, Sponsorship Chair

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I started coming to NAMA events shortly after moving to Nashville. My boss recommended it as a great place to learn about the Nashville marketing community.

You currently serve (or have served) on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
About four years ago – when I first started at my role for Identity Visuals – I literally had no idea what I was doing and knew no one. So many people helped me that first year, taking me to coffee, giving me advice, connecting me with people, and inviting me to events like NAMA. Joining the board and endeavoring to do the same things for other new Nashvillians is one of the ways I’ve tried to pay it forward.

What has been (or was) your proudest moment in this role?
Helping to start the NAMA Podcast and negotiating that sponsorship was definitely one of the highlights. Clark and Chuck at Relationary have been amazing to work with, and it was a blast helping to kick that off.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I’ve learned from the brightest Nashville (and sometimes other cities) has to offer, I’ve made lifetime friends, I’ve been able to help new people to town, and I’ve made great relationships that have resulted in working together. NAMA also was a huge part of making my first conference, the Mental Health Marketing Conference, successful last May.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
The quality of events, the welcoming nature, and the people.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
Seeing our small studio grow over the last four years to work with clients like CBS, Reddit, and Amazon. That and the time I got to tour the NASA Goddard Space station with the NASA animation team and see the James Webb Space Telescope in person – that was pretty cool.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
You will not find a better opportunity in the marketing community to learn, build relationships, and give back than NAMA.

Introducing NAMA’s new Entertainment & Sports Marketing Special Interest Group!

By Stephanie Protz, Guest Blogger | 1.24.17

NAMA’s newest Entertainment & Sports Marketing Special Interest Group (SIG) was created to promote and support the marketing profession within the entertainment and sports industry in the Nashville area.

It is our goal to present programs that facilitate the highest level of marketing excellence to serve Nashville’s entertainment and sports marketing professionals.

The SIG’s in-depth learning events will allow marketing professionals to connect with others in their industry, while hearing best practices from industry leaders. Top-notch luncheon programs, workshops, and social events are being planned for 2017.

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We will bring in distinguished sports and entertainment insiders to learn how Music City’s chart-topping productions are created.

Participation in this group is open to both members and non-members of NAMA; however, membership in the Nashville Chapter of the American Marketing Association is highly encouraged.

Join us at our first event!

Our first networking event will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 31st, from 5-7 pm at Double Dogs – Sylvan Park (just 5 days before Super Bowl 51) to kick off the NAMA’s new Entertainment & Sports Marketing SIG!

Register for the event here.

Wear your favorite NFL jersey or team’s colors and join us for a fun night of networking with other Nashville marketing professionals as we all gear up for the big game. Registration includes appetizer buffet and one drink ticket.

Stick around after the event to watch the Predators game on the big screens. Puck drops at 6 p.m.

SIG Leadership Team is comprised of the following volunteers:
SIG Chair: Tim Earnhart; tim@werkshopbranding.com
SIG Co-Chair: Emily Fay; emily.a.fay@gmail.com
Program Development: Wayne Leeloy, Chair; wayne.leeloy@g7marketing.com
Venue Development: Sharon Kendrew, Chair; skendrew@championlogistics.com
Sponsorship: Monchiere’ Holmes-Jones, Chair; mhjones@mojomktg.com
Communications: Stephanie Protz, Chair; stephprotz@yahoo.com

10 Steps to Create Successful Mobile Apps for Your Organization

By Sanjay Pathak, Guest Blogger

 

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Welcome to the app world.

While an online presence is still mandatory to be relevant in business, the landscape of how information is accessed – and how commerce is conducted online – has changed.

 

The desktop browser is no longer a leader; mobile devices are taking over. Most enterprises have at least one App that provides information or transaction capabilities to their customers. And some companies (e.g. Uber) are solely focused on mobile devices.

It is an App world.

As a marketer, understanding how to create a successful mobile app is important to its ROI.  Whether you are building an App for your external customer or internal users, following these 10 App development best practices will not only provide productivity improvements but also provide greater user experience and adoptions – all resulting in greater success for your business.

  1. Identify Your Audience Characteristics
    These include age, geography, current relationship to your business and control over your audience.  These will affect the complexity of functionalities, need to include geo-diversity.
  1. Select Device/Platform
    Identify which devices and platforms you will be supporting.  If devices are supplied by the organization, focusing on limited device platforms will simplify the process.  For external audiences, you should review your audience and consider limiting the type of devices platforms you support (e.g. iOS and Android).
  1. Select App Architecture
    Identify your App architecture to balance between best user experience and fast time to market. A native app provides richer experience but takes extra effort. Whereas non-native Apps can be developed relatively quickly and provide to time to market advantage.
  1. Select App Form Factor
    Consider what size of mobile device that your users will be bringing. App design will be simpler if you can control the device size. Otherwise your App will need to respond to varying degree of device sizes and that can take a little longer to develop.
  1. Select Mobile App Deployment Model
    Most Apps require back-end business logic, data storage, and integration with other systems. This code and databases have to be deployed somewhere. Choices include:
    Dedicated hosting – useful when security is paramount or utilization is expected to be high 24/7
    Shared hosting – less expensive, adequate performance, and security for most
    Cloud deployment – similar to shared hosting but more cost effective with enhanced performance. A virtual private cloud can provide improved security.
  1. Plan for Signal Strength
    Mobile device network connectivity is more than on or off.  Weak signal or high signal to noise ratio and unpredictable network disconnects must also be considered to ensure good user experience.  For external audiences, use the 80/20 rule – plan for 80% coverage unless your App is mission critical.
  1. Leverage What Is Already Out There
    Avoid duplicating the functionalities of existing social Apps (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram etc.).  When possible, consider integration instead.
  1. Leverage New Mobile Platform Capabilities
    Device-embedded features (camera, location services, compass, etc.) provide data you can use to enhance your App productivity and user experience. Wearables, IoTs, iBeacon, and similar devices can provide additional data either directly or via cloud interfaces to enhance user experience with your App’s functions.
  1. Decide on Tools and Technology
    This is the easy part. Leverage what you already have and choose the tools and technologies that you, your architect, and your developers are comfortable using. That’s right – there is no best set of tools.
  1. Define App Distribution Strategy
    Your App needs to go to your customers’ hands. The major ways for App distribution are:
    Web link on a managed web page – most well-suited for internal audiences. This does not allow for automatic updates, but gives you better control of your audience.
    Public App store (Apple, Google Play, etc) – best for B2C customers. It provides a better downloading, installation and upgrading experience.
    Enterprise App store (i.e. Apperian, Mass 360, Appaloosa) – recommended for B2B audiences. This provides good App upgrades and secure distribution.

As more organizations adopt the power of mobile computing to improve productivity, following mobile App development best practices will enhance user delight with the Apps and help businesses achieve greater success.

 

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Sanjay Pathak, PhD, is a Master Practitioner and Sr. Manager at The North Highland Company, a global consulting firm that has changed the model of how a consultancy serves its clients.

Three Holiday Marketing Campaigns to Bring in the New Year

By Jordan Watkins, Guest Blogger

For many, the holidays are an exciting time of the year spent with family while retelling old stories and making new memories.

It is also an exciting time of year for the marketing industry as new and unique holiday marketing campaigns are launched and become popular topics of conversation among consumers.

Familiarize yourself with three of this year’s most popular campaigns that make perfect conversation starters at family gatherings or a New Year’s Eve party.

#RedCupContest – Starbucks Holiday Red Cups
Some of this year’s holiday marketing campaigns uniquely depended on consumer involvement in ways that deserve recognition.

One in particular is the annual Starbucks Holiday Red Cups campaign. These red cups have been an iconic symbol of the holidays since Starbucks first introduced them in 1997. After all, warm festive drinks are an important part of getting in the holiday spirit!

This year, Starbucks lovers everywhere were encouraged to post their own holiday red cup designs to social media using the hashtag #redcupcontest. Thirteen submissions from six different countries were chosen to be used as the designs for this year’s cups.

NAMA Blogger Chelsea Kallman accurately describes this year’s Starbucks holiday marketing campaign as one which “evokes emotions and promotes sharing by making everything personal.” Read Kallman’s article, How Starbucks Nails (Holiday) Marketing – and how to implement it in your brand that delves deeper into this campaign.

#BusterTheBoxer – John Lewis
As the holiday season began, the European department store John Lewis launched an unforgettable holiday marketing campaign involving a trampoline and “Buster the Boxer,” the featured family’s dog.

On Christmas morning, the family’s daughter, Summer, is not the only one who gets her wish. Buster beats her outside for a long-awaited turn on the new trampoline.

John Lewis has turned “Buster the Boxer” into a brand of its own.

An entire section of the John Lewis website is dedicated to the buzzworthy pup where you can purchase plush toy versions of Buster and other themed merchandise. In the spirit of giving, the department store announced that ten percent of its proceeds from Buster the Boxer merchandise sales will be donated to The Wildlife Trusts charity.

Moreover, John Lewis didn’t stop there. In addition to heavily promoting the hashtag #BusterTheBoxer across social media platforms, a 360-degree interactive video experience is available to view online and is compatible with your Oculus Rift Virtual Reality headset. The company even made custom Snapchat filters available for fans to download.

Although past holiday marketing campaigns from John Lewis have been impressive, the company took this year’s campaign to an entirely new level. Watch the full John Lewis Christmas Advert 2016 – #BusterTheBoxer.

#Barbour Christmas – Barbour’s tribute to Raymond Briggs
The Raymond Briggs children’s tale The Snowman holds an important place in many consumers’ childhood Christmas memories. Over the years, both an animated television special of the original tale and an animated sequel titled The Snowman and the Snowdog have been produced.

This holiday season, Barbour teamed up with Lupus Films to produce a tribute to the classic tales. The advertisement aims to appeal nostalgically to viewers who remember the tales fondly, and features all three characters from the Briggs tales.

The tributary advertisement frames the brand in the same timeless light with the concluding campaign slogan: ‘gifts they’ll remember.’

Barbour launched an email marketing campaign encouraging consumers to nominate and share why they felt a certain loved one deserved to win a gift from Barbour.

Not only did Barbour launch a uniquely nostalgic holiday marketing campaign, but they also incorporated the consumer – leveraging a personal touch to the campaign. Watch Barbour’s tributary holiday advertisement.

Strike up a conversation about one of these three holiday marketing campaigns of 2016 with your family, coworkers, or friends to kick off the new year. Who doesn’t love an adorably heartwarming video in which a group of animals jumps on a trampoline?!

 

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Jordan Watkins is a recent graduate of Sewanee, The University of the South, and serves as an Associate Project Manager with Mailer’s Choice.

Time to invest in a CRM system? Here’s how to make it happen!

By Knight Stivender, Guest Blogger | 12.6.16

Are you a marketer struggling to keep up with your customers and would-be customers Are you finding it a challenge to send them the right emails in a timely fashion? Or make sure they see your digital campaigns?

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Do you know when they’ve visited your website, and do you communicate with them accordingly? Do you know which of your customers are no longer buying from you, and why not? Have you thought about creating a loyalty program to reward your brand cheerleaders?

These are the sorts of dilemmas that can get you thinking about whether it’s finally time to invest a real CRM – customer relationship management – tool. Or – if your organization already has a CRM – to make sure you have access to it and are using it to the fullest extent.

How can you convince your higher-ups to pony-up for CRM?

This blog post breaks it down in six easy(ish) steps.
Knight Stivender
Knight Stivender is Director of Marketing & Development for Alcott Marketing Science and serves as NAMA’s Tech SIG Chair. Follow her on Twitter