Nossi’s Photography Certificate Program will help serious hobbyists and company employees

By Leslie Kerr, Guest Blogger | 7.6.17

A new Photography Certificate Program at Nossi College of Art will help serious hobbyists or business owners and employees who need to take better pictures for their company web sites and social media pages.

Starting this fall, the 16-week program will meet four hours per week at night. Professional photography instructors will utilize Nossi’s facilities to teach camera functions, lighting techniques, studio etiquette and software programs for post-production needs.

“It’s going to be fun, intensive and we’re going to be moving fast,” said Nossi Photography Coordinator Tom Stanford. “We anticipate having very motivated students who want to come in and, in four short months, really improve their skill sets.”

A major advantage for certificate students will be access to Nossi’s 2,500 square foot photo studio, the largest instructional studio in the southeast. They will also receive focused instruction to process their work in a professional setting. The course will be structured in segments that will include some beginning photography, software instruction, advanced photography and cataloging.

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“The idea is to shoot a little bit, learn about how to process those images, shoot more sophisticated stuff, and then learn how to do post-production in the Adobe programs Photoshop and Lightroom,” Stanford said. “Lightroom allows you to organize your photos in a logical way. It also allows you to make changes on photographs and, at any time in the future, go back and undo those changes or edit further.”

While classes are structured, students will be expected to shoot most of their projects outside the classroom. As techniques are explained, outside assignments will be assigned accordingly to help students hone a specific technique, according to Stanford.

Another important element of Nossi’s new photography certificate program is the partnership with Dury’s, a Nashville photography company established in 1882. Part of Dury’s mission is to help customers learn how to use their photography equipment most effectively.

According to Cyrus Vatandoost, Executive Vice President of Nossi College, a partnership between Dury’s and Nossi College is the perfect collaboration.

“Dury’s and Nossi have had a longstanding relationship,” Vatandoost said. “We at Nossi want to support the local photography community and Dury’s has the same vision. They work with our students on camera and lighting options and Dury’s owner Charles Small been a member of Nossi’s photography advisory board for a decade. They help us understand what’s new in photography equipment and what is available for students.”

Nossi’s photography certificate program will offer Dury’s customers a way to advance, either as a hobbyist or staff photographer.

“It’s a two-way street,” Vatandoost said. “Nossi will share knowledge of skill and technique while Dury’s offers insight into available equipment. Their experts will be able to offer suggestions on how to use certain cameras.”

Vatandoost hastened to add that the certificate program is open to anyone with an interest, not just Dury’s customers.

“This certificate will serve many markets,” he said. “Some serious hobbyists already have equipment, have learned all they can on their own and need someone to take them to the next level. Some students may want to start a small full- or part-time photography business and they will benefit from additional skills that we can teach them. Then there are those who work in corporate or business environments who find themselves now being the social media person for their company. This will help them and their employers.”

The Photography Certificate Program will begin in Fall 2017. Course and admissions information is available at www.nossi.edu.

 

[PODCAST] Company culture as marketing with Buffer’s Courtney Seiter

By Chuck Bryant | 5.3.17

Sometimes, the way a company upholds its values can be just as valuable a marketing point as its product, and perhaps nobody knows that better than Buffer Director of People Courtney Seiter, who will be presenting “Company Culture as Marketing” at NAMA Power Lunch on May 4.  

Buffer is a platform for scheduling, sharing and analyzing social media for small businesses, pursuing a two-pronged mission: In addition to giving people a greater voice on social media, Buffer also aims to create the future of work.

“It’s a little bit of a lofty mission there, and it’s kind of up to interpretation sometimes, but we often will talk about what the future of work looks like and how we can get there and how we can help other people talk about that and have those conversations to get there too,” Seiter said.

In order to accomplish this goal, Buffer takes radical approaches to traditional workplace practices.

First, its more than 75 team members are fully remote, with employees living across the world, fostering a global community of both flexibility and creative problem solving.

“We have to create unique ways to work together. If I want to talk to Adnan in Sri Lanka and I want to talk to Hannah in the UK, we’ve got some timezone things, we’ve got some asynchronous communications to overcome,” Seiter said.

Second, Buffer seeks to pioneer a culture of transparency, maintaining measures that not only keep everyone up to date on happenings in the workspace, but giving customers information access as well.

“We have a set of ten values that guide everything we do. One of those is ‘Default to transparency.’ That means, to me, unless there’s a clear tangible reason why you wouldn’t share something within the team and possibly to the wider public, go ahead and share it,” Seiter said. “For us that has created a really wonderful situation where there are no secrets on the team as far as how we work, as far as how we get paid, as far as why we price our product the way we do. And there are no secrets between us and our community and us and our customers.”

In one of its biggest moves of transparency, Buffer began making salaries public in 2013, publishing income numbers for every team member. This move, Seiter said, was a reaction to the lack of guidance available for deciding salaries in tech.

“The idea is when we began to build Buffer in the very early days, there’s a lot of high-level advice on how to pay people, how to structure benefits, but there wasn’t a whole lot for our founders to look at — it was really in the weeds– about how to structure pay and how do you pay people and make sure it’s equitable,” she said.

The move was anxiety-inducing for some team members who were concerned about how people would react once the information was available. However, in the years since Buffer published the numbers, it has proved itself a blueprint for more fair pay and applications to the company have increased by 40 percent.

In addition to transparent salaries, Buffer also allows for email conversations between two or more people to be viewed by any other members of the company, allowing for email trails to be traced back and referenced by anyone who needs them.

Employees also take turns helping out with customer support, allowing them to take part in other means of external transparency as well, showing customers how their money is being spent, and, in Seiter’s experience, seeing how much people appreciate the level of transparency the company upholds.

“The idea is that you as a Buffer customer should know where your money is going to. We respect our customers enough to recognize that’s information they want to know and that it will benefit them and make our relationship stronger to have that knowledge,” she said.

While it takes significant time and effort for a company to implement radical workplace changes like widespread transparency, Seiter said that companies can start by looking into the heart of the company and what drives its mission. Without these goals, it can difficult for companies to put into place future-thinking ways of changing the workplace.

“One thing that people, founders and organizations can do is to look to their values. If they do have values, they tend to be written on a wall or in the breakroom or somewhere not referred to all that often,” Seiter said.

Once those values are identified or created, founders should look for creative new ways to hold people accountable for making progress in company culture, backing them up with policy and experimenting with new methods.

This isn’t something that can be done without a passion behind it, however, Seiter said.

“It has to be genuine and authentic. I don’t think you can start out in this mission thinking ‘Oh, if we share this, the New York Times is going to want our story.’ It has to come form an organic and helpful and authentic and genuine place. People will recognize that and will respond to that. People can also recognize that false note really, really quickly,” she said.

But, if done with a genuine and creative spirit, radical changes in company culture can be a piece of the marketing platform in and of themselves, attracting customers and personalities that are interested and excited to contribute.

“People want to see companies doing good. People want to align themselves with mission, with values they believe in. You have so many choices today; you can choose from any number of products to solve any sort of issue for you, but with that choice there needs to be something else you hang onto. I think values are quickly becoming the thing that I personally choose when I choose a product or a service. And a lot of folks feel that way: They want something more,” Seiter said.

For more information about Buffer, visit them online at buffer.com and check out their transparency blog at open.bufferapp.com.

Seiter will be the keynote speaker at NAMA Power Lunch’s Company Culture as Marketing featuring Buffer on May 4. Register now.

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Knight Stivender

Knight Stivender

Knight Stivender
CEO, Girls To The Moon
Director of Client Success, Alcott Marketing Science
Volunteer, NAMA Marketing Technology SIG Committee

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I joined NAMA six years ago when I was transitioning from a career in Journalism to a career in Marketing and Advertising. I found it to be a nice blend of learning and networking.

You currently serve (or have served) on NAMA’s Board. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I’ve served in a variety of board roles, including Communications Chair, Programming Chair, and Marketing Technology SIG Chair. I initially volunteered for the same reason I think a lot of people do – because a friend roped me into it! But I stuck around because NAMA has been tremendously valuable in my own career, and I feel I owe it to the organization to give back as much as I can.

What has been (or was) your proudest moment in this role?
When I was Programming Chair, my team and I brought in one of NAMA’s most diverse and inclusive lineups of luncheon speakers. I’m proud of that, though I think we can always do better and should be constantly thinking of ways we can be more reflective of our growing and changing community.

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I’ve met people who have become clients, sponsors, mentors, employees, and friends. I could literally put a dollar value on parts of it, but that would be giving away trade secrets. 🙂 And besides that, the most important parts transcend monetization.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
The diversity of industries and professional experiences of the members, speakers and event attendees sets NAMA apart from other professional organizations of which I’ve been a part. I hear a lot of people say this, and I’ve found it to be the case myself.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
My team and I were finalists for a Pulitzer Prize for our breaking news coverage of the Nashville floods in 2010. We knew almost immediately that Saturday the rains started that we were in for a historic weather event, and my own neighborhood was one where people were evacuated in boats. It was incredible.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
You’ll learn a lot – from both a professional standpoint as well as a “who’s who” of the Nashville marketing, advertising and agency scene.

[PODCAST] Busting the myths of brand storytelling with Lindsay Jamieson

By Chuck Bryant | 2.26.17

In today’s advertising environment, selling a product based on emotion is just as important – if not more – than selling based on reason.

“It’s very much about emotional positioning or creating emotion in the narrative. Some people are good at that. Some people don’t dare do it,” said Lindsay Jamieson, founder of brand-strategy company Jamieson Brand.

To Jamieson, however, it seems as though advertisers have taken that narrative strategy a little too far – an idea that he will bring to the table on as the speaker at NAMA Power Lunch on Thursday, March 2, at City Winery.

“I think for the last 10 years, people have been sort of rambling along about, ‘That’s how you do marketing—you tell a story.’  And a lot of marketing companies and advertising agencies make big claims about being storytellers, and ‘We’ll tell your brand’s story,’ and that sort of stuff,” Jamieson said. “But some people are looking at that the wrong way ‘round.”

At the intersection of marketing, branding, and business, different means often come to the forefront of industry attention as the new best solution, Jamieson said.

And while using brand storytelling as a method of advertising is effective in building a two-way relationship with customers, advertisers often forget that what the product has to offer is just as important.

“There’s the product story – which is the buy, which is all of these features, and what color it is, and how much it is, and everything literally tangible around the product offering,” Jamieson continued. Then there’s the brand story, and that’s where you begin to explore higher level concepts, abstract values, beliefs, intangible elements that build personality into the bigger offering

One brand that does this particularly well, Jamieson said, is Louis Vuitton, which manages to seduce potential customers with a big picture that’s full of emotion.

“They take you into another world that you can relate to and desire to be in,” he said.

Jamieson explained how successful ad campaigns can help sell not only the product, but the brand itself; a brand cannot really be owned, but only influenced in how it is perceived. This means that it’s often difficult for people on the inside to gauge a brand’s effectiveness.

“The reason I have a job is because marketing yourself is really, really hard,” Jamieson said.

In order to combat this, advertisers must stay open-minded, listening to the perspectives of those who know the industry, and gathering an arsenal of knowledge by observing how other brands solve or don’t solve problems.

That also includes getting distance from the industry sometimes. Jamieson said he frequently DVRs television to skip the ads, closes his computer for the weekend, and takes walks in nature every single day to avoid overstimulation.

“The last 10 years have been exponential in the growth of noise,” he said.

All of it chalks up to members deliberately disrupting themselves from an industry that is overflowing with new content, even if it’s no7t always good content, Jamieson added.

“I’m not looking for failure, I’m just seeing it. And then I’m getting excited when I see good creativity,” he said.

Jamieson will be the keynote speaker at NAMA Power Lunch’s Debunking the Myths about Brand Storytelling on March 2. Register now.

 

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

Introducing NAMA’s new Entertainment & Sports Marketing Special Interest Group!

By Stephanie Protz, Guest Blogger | 1.24.17

NAMA’s newest Entertainment & Sports Marketing Special Interest Group (SIG) was created to promote and support the marketing profession within the entertainment and sports industry in the Nashville area.

It is our goal to present programs that facilitate the highest level of marketing excellence to serve Nashville’s entertainment and sports marketing professionals.

The SIG’s in-depth learning events will allow marketing professionals to connect with others in their industry, while hearing best practices from industry leaders. Top-notch luncheon programs, workshops, and social events are being planned for 2017.

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We will bring in distinguished sports and entertainment insiders to learn how Music City’s chart-topping productions are created.

Participation in this group is open to both members and non-members of NAMA; however, membership in the Nashville Chapter of the American Marketing Association is highly encouraged.

Join us at our first event!

Our first networking event will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 31st, from 5-7 pm at Double Dogs – Sylvan Park (just 5 days before Super Bowl 51) to kick off the NAMA’s new Entertainment & Sports Marketing SIG!

Register for the event here.

Wear your favorite NFL jersey or team’s colors and join us for a fun night of networking with other Nashville marketing professionals as we all gear up for the big game. Registration includes appetizer buffet and one drink ticket.

Stick around after the event to watch the Predators game on the big screens. Puck drops at 6 p.m.

SIG Leadership Team is comprised of the following volunteers:
SIG Chair: Tim Earnhart; tim@werkshopbranding.com
SIG Co-Chair: Emily Fay; emily.a.fay@gmail.com
Program Development: Wayne Leeloy, Chair; wayne.leeloy@g7marketing.com
Venue Development: Sharon Kendrew, Chair; skendrew@championlogistics.com
Sponsorship: Monchiere’ Holmes-Jones, Chair; mhjones@mojomktg.com
Communications: Stephanie Protz, Chair; stephprotz@yahoo.com

The changing attitudes of consumerism in healthcare with Mark Lee Taylor

By Chuck Bryant, Relationary Marketing | 1.4.17

Healthcare in Nashville is a billion-dollar industry, but not all of what drives consumers’ medical decisions is based on what happens on the operating table or in the physician’s office.

With more than 20 years under his belt, Mark Lee Taylor knows a thing or two about how to inform and advertise to those looking for care for themselves or their loved ones.

Taylor is the Director of Communications for the Clinical Services Group at HCA, where he develops new and innovating ways to connect with consumers in the healthcare sector. He will be moderating a panel on how to navigate the shift toward consumerism in healthcare marketing at NAMA’s Power Lunch on Thursday, Jan. 12, at City Winery.

According to Taylor, many people see healthcare as a consumerist service or product until they or a loved one need healthcare, at which point it becomes a vital need. This urgency sets healthcare apart from most other industries in which major decisions can be postponed or researched over time.

That’s where healthcare marketing comes in – providing information as immediately and seamlessly as possible, while also minimizing negative experiences and impact, Taylor explained.

“People have to look at a lot of information fast and have to find a lot of answers fast. The marketer that can provide the easiest pathway to give them information and solve their problem really has the upper hand,” Taylor said.

Having worked as a healthcare marketing pioneer in the ‘90s with St. Thomas Heart Institute, Taylor has noticed a significant shift in both the focus of the industry and its consumers in just a couple of decades.

“A lot of the advertising campaigns for hospitals were centered around caring and how much the hospitals provided care, what great care they provided. It focused on advertising and community outreach more than any other marketing technique. Things have certainly changed since then,” Taylor said.

Today, he said, there is an inherent expectation that there is caring in the service industry, so people are more interested in good outcomes and cost transparency. Taylor believes that easy access to healthcare information – both true and false – has contributed to this shift.

“There’s so much more information available than there was previously. Before that, you had to rely on a physician or someone else or word of mouth to find out what you wanted. Back when we were doing advertising for healthcare systems, we were just trying to get people to indicate that they wanted to make a choice about where they went,” Taylor said.

Today’s healthcare consumers not only have more of a choice in where they seek care, but they are also “savvier” consumers with a higher service expectation, Taylor continued. Whereas patients might previously have been willing to wait two hours at a physician’s office, consumers today place emphasis on access and convenience in each step of their healthcare process

“There’s a lot of internal resistance in healthcare to refer to patients as consumers, and I think that point has finally hit the tipping point where people understand ‘Oh, they’re patients and consumers. Consumers have choices and are not going to blindly go where they’re sent.’”

Looking toward the future of healthcare marketing, Taylor said that big focuses will be on implementation of service standards in the physician’s offices and quick, convenient means of response between health care services and consumers.

“There’s two ways of looking at anything, and life’s all about how you look at it. In this case, it’s a really exciting time to be in healthcare. We’re going to need creative, innovative ideas more than ever. And who is it that comes up with those things in America? It’s marketers,” he said.

Connect with Taylor on LinkedIn.

On Jan. 12, Taylor will moderate How Consumerism is Affecting Healthcare Marketing alongside SmileDirectClub’s Hal Hassall, Nicole Provonchee of MissionPoint Health, and Celina Burns, consultant to Healthcare Blue Book at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.


chuck-bryant
Chuck Bryant is co-founder and CEO of Relationary Marketing, a podcast production agency that creates broadcast-quality interviews for rich content marketing, event promotion, relationship nurturing and thought leadership.

Volunteer Spotlight: Emily Fay

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Emily Fay
Marketing Manager, Remar, Inc.
Secretary (2015)
Board Member at Large (2012-2013)
Collegiate Relation Chair (2010-2012)

What prompted you to join NAMA?
I moved to Nashville in 2007 on a whim, I had no job, just my best friend from 3rd grade. As a member of the University of Nebraska – Lincoln AMA chapter I knew, if I wanted to meet the top marketers in town I needed to attend NAMA’s events.

You served on NAMA’s Board for several years. Why did you decide to volunteer?
I wasn’t really looking for more activities to get involved in when I was asked to help with the Collegiate Relations committee. However, I am a strong believer in the more you put into an organization the more you get out of it.

I also felt that having been a member of a collegiate chapter in the past, gave me some insight into what students would need and want from our chapter.

What was your proudest moment in your role as Collegiate Relations Chair?
That is easy! Dreaming up and executing the Marketing the Marketer event.

This event gave students the opportunity to connect with Marketers and HR professionals. They got to ask questions about everything from what it is like to work in Marketing to what to expect in an interview.

The first year we did this, I was expecting that maybe 15-20 students would be there, but we sold out of tickets and 40 students showed up!

How has NAMA impacted you professionally?
I don’t know where my career would be without NAMA. I have found both of my marketing positions in Nashville through this organization. The first role was an Account Manager at Allegiant Direct, Inc., and that job found me through the NAMA job board. The second role, my current position at Remar, was found through a NAMA Mixer.

What differentiates NAMA from other groups?
NAMA has a good mix of marketing folks, that are excited to learn from each other.

This is organization is fantastic for networking. The best part is that if your networking skill level doesn’t matter. If you are new to it, someone will guide you along. If networking is your expertise, there is always someone new and interesting to meet at NAMA.

Can you share a memorable experience from your career thus far?
It is hard for me to pin point just one experience. There are highlights from every marketing role I have had. The one that is sticking out to me right now hasn’t happened yet. But, in a couple weeks the non-profit organization I started, Nashville Huskers, will host its 100th football watch party.

Why would you encourage others to join and volunteer with NAMA?
I said this before, but the more you put into NAMA the more you get out of it, and in order to volunteer with NAMA, you need to be a member.

When you volunteer with NAMA you make connections with incredible marketers, and they can actually see the quality of your work. For me, when it came to finding a job, the recommendation from someone who I had volunteered with was a factor in getting the job I have today.

NAMA Member Brings Husker Fans Together for a Kick-off with a Cause

By Katie Soltas, NAMA Blogger | 10.30.16

Remar, Inc.’s marketing manager and longtime NAMA member, Emily Fay, simply wanted to bond with a few Nebraska Cornhusker fans during football season without leaving her new home of Nashville.

What she started became more than a small group of game day buddies, but a movement that has generated thousands of dollars in college scholarships for Nashvillians and has pumped nearly $240,000 into Music City’s economy through food and beverage sales.

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Fay moved to Nashville in 2007 from Nebraska. In 2009, she performed digital research and recruiting on Facebook and LinkedIn, inviting Husker alumni to watch the football season opener at what was formerly Closing Bell on Demonbreun Hill. Twenty people confirmed their attendance, but 80 fans showed up to the first game – greatly exceeding Fay’s expectations.

Since then, the “Nashville Huskers” migrated to several locations in the city until they landed a permanent home, the Tin Roof 2 in Cool Springs, where they have met the past four seasons.

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More than 150 fans gather each weekend, and Fay has kept detailed records showing the group’s annual financial impact for the establishments where they congregate. Although it can be challenging for restaurants to meet the needs of the large group, the herd brings in up to $40,000 in revenue each football season.

But for Fay, watching the games wasn’t enough.

Through merchandise sales and other means, she led the group in raising $18,000 over the past five years for the University of Nebraska Legends scholarship that goes to three deserving Middle Tennessee college applicants every year.

College football brings the Nashville Huskers together, but the professional networking and relationship-building opportunities is what keeps the group alive and thriving.

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During our interview, Fay rattles off several long-lost relatives and friends that found each other through the group, including her mother and a childhood friend who rekindled their friendship. Two Husker alumni fell in love (let’s assume over beer and wings) during a season and are now married. One Nashville Husker’s friends from Purdue came every year when their team played Nebraska. Last year, he tragically passed away from cancer and his friends still came to Nashville during the Purdue game to honor him.

“Everyone in the group knows each other now, and we are all connected somehow,” said Fay, who is looking forward to their 100th watch party on Nov. 19. “I never imagined it would turn into a true community.”

[PODCAST] Finding your personal value with Jennifer Way

By Chuck Bryant, Relationary Marketing | 10.27.16

Jennifer Way wants to help make marketers their own biggest advocates by revealing their personal value.

“Your resume should be the Cliff Notes of your values, not a job description,” Way said.

Way is a consultant and president of Way Solutions. Her company has worked with Disney, Amazon, and Honda to help get the most out of their employees. She’ll be helping guests unlock the power of their personal value at NAMA’s Power Lunch on Thursday, Nov. 3.

“Unleashing the power of your personal value is about learning how to identify the key factors that will get you the recognition and rewards you need,” Way said. “What employer doesn’t want more value from an employee?”

Way said that finding personal value is not about expanding any more effort, but instead is about understanding dynamics in your work system.

People in the workplace don’t learn how to be personal advocates on their own. Instead they learn slowly from other’s mistakes, when really they need to look at themselves objectively and put themselves in the opposite role, according to Way. This is where marketers have a unique advantage.  

“They understand exactly how to look at themselves objectively in a business-to-business situation, but feel awkward turning that marketing eye on themselves.”

Connect with Way on LinkedIn.

On Nov. 3, Jennifer Way presents Unlock the Power of Your Value at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

chuck-bryant
Chuck Bryant is co-founder and CEO of Relationary Marketing, a podcast production agency that creates broadcast-quality interviews for rich content marketing, event promotion, relationship nurturing and thought leadership.

[PODCAST] Dan Rogers brings stories to life at the Grand Ole Opry

By Chuck Bryant, Relationary Marketing | 10.6.16

Dan Rogers remembers listening to the original Grand Ole Opry radio show with his parents, trying to guess how large the crowd was or debating whether or not there would be a surprise guest.

“The Opry was a place you could go to in your mind on a Saturday night when you’re 8 years old and stuck in the middle of Nowhere, Illinois.”

Now almost 30 years later, Rogers is the senior marketing director at the Grand Ole Opry, and will be the featured guest at Nashville American Marketing Association Power Lunch on October 13, discussing the impact of the Opry’s storytelling opportunities on marketing.  

Rogers started as a graduate intern right after college, and hasn’t looked back since. He said The Opry presents so many unique opportunities for stories and experiences.

“It’s a place where you have all these personalities coming together,” Rogers said, “You could have Carrie Underwood listening to a bluegrass artist, or Vince Gill watching a new performer who idolized him growing up.”  

The tradition of the Opry starts with the stories artists and fans share about their unique experiences with the radio show, concerts, or personalities.

“It’s about the music, but it’s also this very special relationship between the artists and fans.”

For an establishment seeped in tradition, Rogers is trying to expand the reach of their stories through organic uses of social media by artists and fans. In the old days the only method of delivering an experience was through radio or TV. Now stars and fans interact on social media, sharing stories in real time.

youre-reminded-of-what-an-important-part-of-america-is-right-in-our-backyard-in-nashville

While the show might not be as prominent as it once was, the Opry is still an important staple to so many people. Rogers thinks back to watching so many up and coming artists who perform at the Opry for the first time, and invite all their family members from all over the world to see them.    

“You’re reminded of what an important part of America is right in our backyard in Nashville.”

Connect with Rogers on LinkedIn.

On October 13, Dan Rogers presents The Grand Ole Opry’s Secrets to Using Storytelling for Impact at the NAMA Power Lunch at City Winery. Register now.  

Editor’s Note: The NAMA Power Lunch podcast is a production of Relationary Marketing in partnership with the Nashville American Marketing Association. This episode was produced by Chuck Bryant and host Clark Buckner, edited and mixed by Jess Grommet, with music by Zachary D. Noblitt.

 

chuck-bryant
Chuck Bryant is co-founder and CEO of Relationary Marketing, a podcast production agency that creates broadcast-quality interviews for rich content marketing, event promotion, relationship nurturing and thought leadership.